Energy

— Nov 28, 2017
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Global Petroleum Survey 2017

The 2017 Global Petroleum Survey finds that British Columbia now ranks as the least-attractive Canadian province for oil and gas investment—followed by Alberta. In this year’s global survey, which was conducted after the provincial election, B.C. ranks 76th out of the 97 jurisdictions and earned low marks for political stability and a high cost of regulatory compliance. Alberta ranks 33rd. Newfoundland and Labrador was the most attractive Canadian province for oil and gas investment, and ranks 4th worldwide. Texas is the most attractive jurisdiction globally for oil and gas investment, followed by Oklahoma.

— Oct 17, 2017
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Rising Electricity Costs and Declining Employment in Ontario’s Manufacturing Sector

Rising Electricity Costs and Declining Employment in Ontario’s Manufacturing Sector finds that Ontario’s rising electricity prices—now the highest in Canada—have cost the province an estimated 74,881 manufacturing jobs since the 2008 recession.

— Jul 27, 2017
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Safety First: Intermodal Safety for Oil and Gas Transportation

Safety First: Intermodal Safety for Oil and Gas Transportation finds that transporting oil by pipelines is more than twice as safe as using rail, and marine tankers are safer still with a markedly improved safety record over the past 40 years. While oil shipped by tanker has increased from 1.4 billion tonnes in 1970 to 2.9 billion tonnes in 2015, the amount of spillage has plummeted by 98 per cent.

— Jul 20, 2017
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Evaluating Electricity Price Growth in Ontario

Evaluating Electricity Price Growth in Ontario finds that hydro prices in Ontario increased twice as fast as the national average over the past decade, and the average Toronto resident now pays $60 more per month than the average Canadian for electricity.

— May 4, 2017
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Poor Implementation Undermines Carbon Tax Efficiency in Canada

Poor Implementation Undermines Carbon Tax Efficiency in Canada finds that the theoretical benefits of carbon taxes and cap-and-trade schemes—that they can lower emissions and improve the economy at the same time—are negated by poor implementation such as layering these schemes on top of, instead of replacing existing regulations.

— Jan 17, 2017
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Did the Coal Phase-out Reduce Ontario Air Pollution?

Did the Coal Phase-out Reduce Ontario Air Pollution finds that the coal phase-out produced only a small reduction in fine particulates, a common measure of air pollution, and in Toronto and Hamilton, the reduction was statistically insignificant. In fact, had the province completed its modernization of the coal-fired plants, instead of shutting them down, fine particulate reductions of the same size could have been achieved at a much lower cost.

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