Energy

— Mar 5, 2019
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Effective Tax and Royalty Rates on New Investment in Oil and Gas after Canadian and American Tax Reform

Effective Tax and Royalty Rates on New Investment in Oil and Gas after Canadian and American Tax Reform finds that, despite the federal government’s recent (albeit temporary) investment incentive measures, the effective tax rate on new investment in the oil and gas sectors are uncompetitive in two of Canada’s major energy-producing provinces: Saskatchewan and B.C. In fact, Saskatchewan has the highest taxes on new investment in both oil and gas among all major energy-producing jurisdictions in North America, and B.C. has the second-highest tax rate on new gas investments in Canada.

— Feb 27, 2019
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Carbon Pricing in Alberta

Carbon Pricing in Alberta finds that the province’s carbon tax is unlikely to meaningfully reduce global carbon emissions. Crucially, Alberta’s carbon tax doesn’t replace existing regulations, is not revenue neutral and the government plans to continue subsidizing carbon-emitting alternatives, all of which distort the market pressures a tax would place on emissions, thus negating the theoretical benefits of a pricing scheme.

— Nov 29, 2018
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Global Petroleum Survey 2018

Global Petroleum Survey, 2018 finds that Alberta and British Columbia are the least-attractive jurisdictions in Canada for oil and gas investment. And for the first time in more than five years, no Canadian province even ranked in the top 10 most-attractive worldwide, with nine of the top 10 spots going to U.S. states.

— Oct 4, 2018
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Electricity Reform in Ontario: Getting Power Prices Down

Electricity Reform in Ontario: Getting Power Prices Down finds that the Ontario government could reduce current electricity prices for Ontarians by 24 per cent by either cancelling or renegotiating existing contracts with wind and solar-power generators. These contracts represent almost 40 per cent of the Global Adjustment charge on Ontarians’ hydro bills while providing just seven per cent of the province’s total electricity generation.

— May 8, 2018
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The Cost of Pipeline Constraints in Canada

The Cost of Pipeline Constraints in Canada finds that this year, the Canadian energy sector will lose $15.8 billion in foregone revenues as a result of a shortage of pipeline capacity in Canada, which drives down the price of Canadian oil because of an overdependence on the U.S. market and an increased reliance on oil-by-rail—a more costly (and less safe) mode of transport.

— Apr 12, 2018
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Understanding the Changes in Ontario's Electricity Markets and Their Effects

Understanding Changes in Ontario’s Electricity Markets and Their Effects finds that poor energy policy choices—including Ontario’s Green Energy Act—has increased electricity prices for residents, cost tens of thousands of manufacturing workers their jobs and produced only minimal health and environmental benefits.

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