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Restoring Ontario's Public Finances

Restoring Ontario’s Public Finances finds that Ontario’s new provincial government can balance the budget and even cut taxes, but doing so will require a focus on spending discipline. In fact, a five per cent reduction in spending from 2017/18 levels would achieve a balanced budget by 2020/21—years earlier than the 2024/25 timeline set by the previous government—and also free up $21 billion in fiscal room, which could be used to reduce taxes.

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Canadian Consumer Tax Index 2018 finds that last year the average Canadian family spent 43 per cent of its income on taxes, more than housing, food and clothing costs combined, which made up just 35.6 per cent. The annual study tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian household from 1961 to 2017, and looks at both visible and hidden taxes that families pay to the federal, provincial and local governments, including income, payroll, sales, property, health, fuel and alcohol taxes, and more.

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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta, 2018

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta finds that public-sector employees in Alberta—including municipal, provincial and federal government workers—received 9.6 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector last year, and also enjoyed more generous pensions, earlier retirement, more personal leave and greater job security.

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Financial Markets, Laws, and Entrepreneurship

Financial Markets, Laws, and Entrepreneurship and Spurring Entrepreneurship through Capital Gains Tax Reform—chapters in a recent book on demographics and entrepreneurship—find that eliminating, or at least lowering, Canada’s uncompetitive tax rate on capital gains is the best policy for encouraging entrepreneurial financing, which is critical for new business startups.

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The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2018

The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2018 finds that a typical Canadian family of four will pay $12,935 for health care in 2018. After adjusting for inflation, that’s an increase of 68.5 per cent since 1997, the first year estimates could be calculated. For single Canadians, health-care costs have more than doubled over that same time period—from $2,115 (in 2018 dollars) to $4,640 this year.

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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia, 2018

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia finds that public-sector employees in B.C.—including municipal, provincial and federal government workers—received 7.5 per cent higher wages on average than comparable workers in the private sector last year, and also enjoyed more generous pensions, earlier retirement, more personal leave and greater job security.

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Permit Times for Mining Exploration in 2017

Permit Times for Mining Exploration in 2017 finds that investors are losing confidence in the mineral exploration permit process in many Canadian provinces—including British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec—which has grown longer over the past 10 years and less transparent.

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Implications of the proposed changes to Canada's pharmaceutical pricing regulations

Implications of the Proposed Changes to Canada’s Pharmaceutical Pricing Regulations finds that the federal government’s plan to lower the cost of patented pharmaceuticals in Canada through new regulations seriously risks limiting patient access to new innovative drugs. The is the first study in a series on pharmaceutical drug pricing policy reforms.