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Increasing the Minimum Wage in Ontario: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy

Increasing the Minimum Wage in Ontario: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy finds that raising the minimum wage would do little to reduce poverty in Ontario because the vast majority of minimum-wage earners don’t live in low-income households. In fact, nearly 60 per cent of all minimum-wage earners in the province in 2017 were teenagers or young adults aged 15 to 24, almost all of whom (86.3 per cent) lived with their parents or other relatives.

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Report Card on British Columbia's Secondary Schools 2018

The Report Card on British Columbia’s Secondary Schools 2018 rates more than 250 public and independent secondary schools based on seven academic indicators using student results from annual provincewide exams, grade-to-grade transition rates, and graduation rates. The Report Card provides parents with information they can’t easily get anywhere else. In addition to five years of academic results, the Report Card also shows which schools are improving or falling behind.

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Report Card on Alberta’s High Schools 2018

The Report Card on Alberta’s High Schools 2018 rates 262 public, independent, separate and charter schools based on eight academic indicators generated from Grade 12 provincewide testing, grade-to-grade transition and graduation rates. The report card provides parents with information they can’t easily get anywhere else. In addition to five years of academic results, the report card also shows which schools are improving or falling behind.

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This year Tax Freedom Day falls on June 10. Tax Freedom Day measures the total yearly tax burden imposed on Canadian families by all levels of government:  If you had to pay all your taxes up front, you’d give government every dollar you earned before June 10. This year, the average Canadian family (with two or more people) will pay $50,464 in total taxes or 43.6 per cent of its annual income.

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Understanding the Regulatory Framework Governing Private and Public Pensions

Understanding the Regulatory Framework Governing Private and Public Pensions finds that private pensions are subject to far more rules and regulations than the Canada Pension Plan (CPP), are more complex in their make-up and face higher costs as a result.

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Federal Reforms and the Empty Shell of Environmental Assessment

Federal Reforms and the Empty Shell of Environmental Assessment finds that environmental assessments for resource development projects, such as oil and gas pipelines, have always been arbitrary and political, and the federal government’s proposed reforms—contained in Bill C-69—do nothing to change that. If anything, the changes may increase uncertainty in the project approval process.

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Increasing the Minimum Wage in British Columbia: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy

Increasing the Minimum Wage in British Columbia: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy finds that despite misperceptions, more than 80 per cent of B.C.’s minimum-wage earners don’t actually live in low-income families. In fact, last year, the majority of minimum-wage earners in the province (55.7 per cent) were teenagers or young adults aged 15 to 24, almost all of whom (77.9 per cent) lived with their parents or other relatives.

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The Decline of the Other Alberta Advantage: Debt Service Costs in Alberta Are Rising

The Decline of the Other Alberta Advantage: Debt Service Costs in Alberta Are Rising finds that every Albertan will pay, on average, $442 this year in interest on the province’s growing debt, compared to just $58 a decade ago. And if the province’s debt trend continues, debt-servicing costs may exceed $1,000 per person within the next 10 years.