Taxes

— Nov 8, 2017
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Effect of Federal Income Tax Changes on Canadian Families Who Are in the Bottom 20 Percent of Earners

Effect of Federal Income Tax Changes on Canadian Families Who Are in the Bottom 20 Percent of Earners finds that the federal government’s tax changes, implemented since the 2015 election, have raised income taxes for the majority (61 per cent) of taxpaying Canadian families in the bottom 20 per cent of earners, which includes families with children with incomes up to $66,448.

— Sep 26, 2017
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Measuring the Impact of Federal Personal Income Tax Changes on Middle Income Canadian Families

Measuring the Impact of Federal Personal Income Tax Changes on Middle Income Canadian Families finds that 81 per cent of middle-class families in Canada are paying higher income taxes due to changes made by the federal government. On average, middle-class families with children will pay $840 more in federal income taxes this year.

— Aug 24, 2017
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Canadian Consumer Tax Index 2017 finds that last year the average Canadian family paid twice as much of their income in taxes (42.5 per cent) as they did for housing (22.1 per cent). The annual study tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian household from 1961 to 2016, and looks at both visible and hidden taxes that families pay to the federal, provincial and local governments, including income, payroll, sales, property, health, fuel and alcohol taxes, and more.

— Jun 14, 2017
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Impact of Proposed NDP-Green Tax Changes on BC Families

The Impact of Proposed NDP-Green Tax Changes on British Columbian Families finds that the average B.C. family’s tax bill would increase by $594 under an NDP-Green government, led mainly by a $482 increase in fuel and carbon taxes.

— May 4, 2017
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Poor Implementation Undermines Carbon Tax Efficiency in Canada

Poor Implementation Undermines Carbon Tax Efficiency in Canada finds that the theoretical benefits of carbon taxes and cap-and-trade schemes—that they can lower emissions and improve the economy at the same time—are negated by poor implementation such as layering these schemes on top of, instead of replacing existing regulations.

— Apr 6, 2017
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History and Development of Canada's Personal Income Tax

The History and Development of Canada’s Personal Income Tax: Zero to 50 in 100 years finds that the tax, which began as a small wartime revenue generator, has morphed into a costly, complex behemoth that’s difficult to administer and makes Canada uncompetitive. In fact, when compared to U.S. states, Canadian provinces have seven of the eight highest top combined rates, with Nova Scotia, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, P.E.I. and Manitoba all over 50 per cent.

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