Taxes

— Mar 14, 2019
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A Spending Framework for Alberta: Balancing the Need for Deficit Elimination and Tax Reform

A Spending Framework for Alberta: Balancing the Need for Deficit Elimination and Tax Reform finds that the Alberta government could balance its budget by 2021/22—and create the fiscal room for much-needed tax relief—if program spending were cut by 10.9 per cent over the next three years. While a 10.9 per cent spending reduction would be significant, it is substantially smaller than the reductions implemented by the Klein government in the 1990s. It would also bring Alberta’s per-person spending closer into line with neighbouring British Columbia, which currently spends 21 per cent less per person than Alberta does.

— Mar 12, 2019
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Canada’s Rising Personal Tax Rates and Falling Tax Competitiveness (2019)

Canada’s Rising Personal Tax Rates and Falling Tax Competitiveness finds that Canadian workers across the income spectrum—and across the country—pay significantly higher personal income taxes than their American counterparts. In fact, at incomes of $50,000, $150,000 and $300,000, among all 61 provinces and states in Canada and the U.S., the 10 highest combined personal income tax rates are in the 10 Canadian provinces.

— Mar 5, 2019
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Effective Tax and Royalty Rates on New Investment in Oil and Gas after Canadian and American Tax Reform

Effective Tax and Royalty Rates on New Investment in Oil and Gas after Canadian and American Tax Reform finds that, despite the federal government’s recent (albeit temporary) investment incentive measures, the effective tax rate on new investment in the oil and gas sectors are uncompetitive in two of Canada’s major energy-producing provinces: Saskatchewan and B.C. In fact, Saskatchewan has the highest taxes on new investment in both oil and gas among all major energy-producing jurisdictions in North America, and B.C. has the second-highest tax rate on new gas investments in Canada.

— Jan 29, 2019
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Assessing British Columbia's Tax Competitiveness

Assessing British Columbia’s Tax Competitiveness finds that B.C. now has the ninth highest top combined personal income tax rate in Canada and the United States, which hurts the province’s ability to compete with neighbouring jurisdictions for skilled-workers and investment. The province also has the highest taxes on business investment anywhere in Canada.

— Jan 8, 2019
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Can Alberta Restore Its Tax Advantage?

Can Alberta Restore Its Tax Advantage? finds that for Alberta to become one of the lowest taxed jurisdictions in North America again, the province would require a six per cent single-rate personal income tax. Over the past five years, Alberta went from having the lowest top combined (federal/provincial) personal income tax rate in North America to one of the highest, due to tax increases at the provincial and federal levels and tax cuts in the United States.

— Dec 18, 2018
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Reforming Capital Gains Taxes in Alberta

Reforming Capital Gains Taxes in Alberta finds that Alberta should eliminate the provincial portion of the capital gains tax—lowering it from 24 to 16.5 per cent—to become more competitive with key energy-producing jurisdictions in the United States. Currently nine U.S. states do not impose a state-level capital gains tax, including several key energy-producing states—Texas, Wyoming and Alaska—which directly compete with Alberta for investment, entrepreneurs and even highly-skilled workers.

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