Taxes

— Sep 28, 2022
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Comparing Provincial Marginal Tax Rates for Middle-Income Earners Across Canada

Comparing Provincial Marginal Tax Rates for Middle Income Earners Across Canada finds that middle-income workers in Atlantic Canada pay much higher provincial personal income tax burdens than Western Canadians earning similar amounts. In fact, whereas Atlantic Canadian workers who earn the national average income ($52,750 in 2022) face provincial personal income tax burdens ranging from $4,463 in New Brunswick to $5,318 in Nova Scotia, workers in Western Canada earning the same amount pay provincial income tax burdens of between $2,353 in British Columbia and $3,914 in Saskatchewan.

— Sep 21, 2022
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Taxes versus the Necessities of Life: The Canadian Consumer Tax Index 2022 edition

Taxes Versus the Necessities of Life: The Canadian Consumer Tax Index, 2022 Edition is a new study that finds the average Canadian family spent 43 per cent of its income on taxes in 2021 compared to 35.7 per cent on basic necessities—more than housing, food and clothing costs combined. Since 1961, the average Canadian family’s total tax bill has increased nominally by 2,440 per cent, dwarfing increases in annual housing costs (1,751 per cent), clothing (643 per cent) and food (790 per cent).

— Jun 15, 2022
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This year, Tax Freedom Day is Wednesday, June 15. If you had to pay all your federal, provincial and municipal taxes up front, you would give government every dollar you earned from January 1st to Tax Freedom Day, when Canadians finally start working for themselves. In 2022, the average Canadian family (with two or more people) will pay 45.2 per cent of its annual income in taxes, including income taxes, payroll taxes, health taxes, sales taxes, property taxes, fuel taxes, carbon taxes and more.

— May 26, 2022
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Understanding the Changing Ratio of Working-Age Canadians to Seniors and Its Consequences

Understanding the Changing Ratio of Working-Age Canadians to Seniors and Its Consequences is a new study that finds as Canada’s population ages, the number of working-aged Canadians relative to the number of seniors has declined from 5.4 in 2000 to 3.4 in 2022, which means government spending related to seniors is increasing at the same time that the growth in tax revenues is declining.

— Apr 26, 2022
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What Are the Economic Costs of Raising Revenue by the Canadian Federal Government?

What Are the Economic Costs of Raising Revenue by the Canadian Federal Government? finds that for every additional ($1) dollar of personal income tax revenue collected by the federal government, $2.86 is lost in economic activity because of less investment, less entrepreneurship, less spending and other behavioural changes that shrink the tax base.

— Apr 6, 2022
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No Free Lunch for the 99 Percent: Estimating Revenue Effects from Taxes on Top Earners

No Free Lunch for the 99 Percent: Estimating Revenue Effects from Taxes on Top Earners finds that if the federal government, which plans to table its next budget this week, wants to fund a major expansion of government, it simply can’t raise enough tax revenue solely from Canada’s upper-income families.

Taxes Research Experts