Joel Emes

Senior Fellow, Fraser Institute

Joel Emes is President of Abacus Economics and a Fraser Institute Senior Fellow who rejoined the Institute after a stint as a senior advisor to British Columbia’s provincial government. He previously served as a senior analyst, then as acting executive director, at the BC Progress Board. Prior to that, Joel was a senior research economist at the Fraser Institute where he initiated and led several flagship projects in the areas of tax freedom and government performance, spending, debt, and unfunded liabilities. Joel holds a B.A. and an M.A. in economics from  Simon Fraser University.

Recent Research by Joel Emes

— May 7, 2019
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Investment in the Canadian and U.S. Oil and Gas Sectors: A Tale of Diverging Fortunes

Investment in the Canadian and U.S. Oil and Gas Sectors: A Tale of Diverging Fortunes finds that from 2016 to 2018, capital investment in Canada’s upstream oil and gas industry (essentially, exploration and production) increased only 15 per cent compared to 41 per cent in the U.S. over the same period. And, the percentage of oil and gas capital investment in Canada as a share of total capital investment has plummeted, from 28 per cent in 2014 to 13.9 per cent in 2018.

— Apr 9, 2019
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A Turning Point or More of the Same? Ontario's Fiscal Choices in Budget 2019

A Turning Point or More of the Same? Ontario's Fiscal Choices in Budget 2019 finds that the Ontario provincial government could balance the budget by 2020/21 with a one per cent reduction in program spending in each of the next two years. A 9.8 per cent reduction over the next two years would not only achieve balance, but would also allow the government to lower taxes and increase tax competitiveness.

— Apr 3, 2019
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Albertans Make Disproportionate Contributions to National Programs: The Canada Pension Plan as a Case Study

Albertans Make Disproportionate Contributions to National Programs: The Canada Pension Plan as a Case Study finds that in 2017, workers in Alberta paid $2.9 billion more into the Canada Pension Plan than Alberta retirees received in CPP payments. In fact, from 2008 to 2017, the total net contribution to the CPP from Albertan workers—the amount over and above what Alberta retirees were paid—was a staggering $27.9 billion. Ontario, the next highest contributing province, had a net contribution of just $7.4 billion over the same decade.