Joel Emes

Senior Fellow, Fraser Institute

Joel Emes is President of Abacus Economics and a Fraser Institute Senior Fellow who rejoined the Institute after a stint as a senior advisor to British Columbia’s provincial government. He previously served as a senior analyst, then as acting executive director, at the BC Progress Board. Prior to that, Joel was a senior research economist at the Fraser Institute where he initiated and led several flagship projects in the areas of tax freedom and government performance, spending, debt, and unfunded liabilities. Joel holds a B.A. and an M.A. in economics from  Simon Fraser University.

Recent Research by Joel Emes

— Aug 23, 2018
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Comparing Municipal Government Finances in Metro Vancouver, 2018 Edition

Comparing Municipal Government Finances in Metro Vancouver, 2018 finds that the City of Vancouver spent 84 per cent more, per resident, and collected 61 per cent higher per resident revenues in 2016 than Surrey, the next largest municipality by population in the region. The study compares 17 of the Metro Vancouver Regional District’s 21 municipalities on several measures—including government spending, revenue and debt—from 2007 to 2016, the most recent year of available data.

— Jun 26, 2018
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Comparing the Standardized Test Scores of British Columbia’s Public and Independent Schools

Comparing the Standardized Test Scores of British Columbia’s Public and Independent Schools finds that over a five-year period, students at non-elite independent schools averaged statistically significant higher scores than public students in 10 of the province’s 11 standardized tests in both elementary and secondary schools, even though after-tax incomes for families with children at both types of schools are the same.

— May 3, 2018
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Expansion of the Canada Pension Plan and the Unintended Effect on Domestic Investment

Expansion of the Canada Pension Plan and the Unintended Effect on Domestic Investment finds that by increasing the Canada Pension Plan payroll tax, the federal and provincial governments will inadvertently shrink the pool of money available for investments in Canada—potentially up to $114 billion by 2030.