Joel Emes

Senior Fellow, Fraser Institute

Joel Emes is Fraser Institute Senior Fellow who rejoined the Institute after a stint as a senior advisor to British Columbia’s provincial government. He previously served as a senior analyst, then as executive director (2009 to 2011), at the BC Progress Board. Prior to that, Joel was a senior research economist at the Fraser Institute, where he initiated and led several flagship projects in the areas of tax freedom and government performance, spending, debt, and unfunded liabilities. Joel holds a B.A. and an M.A. in economics from Simon Fraser University.

Recent Research by Joel Emes

— Nov 30, 2017
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Towards a Better Understanding of Income Inequality in Canada

Towards a Better Understanding of Income Inequality in Canada is a new book that finds the problem of inequality isn’t nearly as bad in Canada as people are sometimes led to believe. Canadians are more able, thanks to opportunities of mobility, to get out of a low-income situation, middle-class incomes are not stagnating and most people can and do build-up wealth over the course of their lives.

— Nov 15, 2017
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The Impact of Interprovincial Migration of Seniors on Provincial Health Care Spending

The Impact of Interprovincial Migration of Seniors on Provincial Health Care Spending finds that migrating seniors have increased B.C.’s health-care costs by more than $7.0 billion over the past 36 years, while effectively saving Quebec $6.0 billion. That’s because Canadians pay most of their lifetime taxes during their working lives, but consume most of their health-care costs after they retire. B.C. and five other provinces saw a net inflow of seniors since 1980, while Quebec and the other provinces saw a net outflow.

— Oct 19, 2017
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Comparing the Family Income of Students in Alberta’s Independent and Public Schools

Comparing the Family Income of Students in Alberta’s Independent and Public Schools finds that despite common misperceptions, Alberta families with children in most independent schools actually have slightly lower incomes than families with children in public schools.