Joel Emes

Senior Economist, Fraser Institute

Joel Emes is a Senior Economist, Addington Centre for Measurement, at the Fraser Institute. Joel started his career with the Fraser Institute and rejoined after a stint as a senior analyst, acting executive director and then senior advisor to British Columbia’s provincial government. Joel initiated and led several flagship projects in the areas of tax freedom and government performance, spending, debt, and unfunded liabilities. He supports many projects at the Institute in areas such as investment, equalization, school performance and fiscal policy. Joel holds a B.A. and an M.A. in economics from Simon Fraser University.

Recent Research by Joel Emes

— May 26, 2022
Printer-friendly version
Understanding the Changing Ratio of Working-Age Canadians to Seniors and Its Consequences

Understanding the Changing Ratio of Working-Age Canadians to Seniors and Its Consequences is a new study that finds as Canada’s population ages, the number of working-aged Canadians relative to the number of seniors has declined from 5.4 in 2000 to 3.4 in 2022, which means government spending related to seniors is increasing at the same time that the growth in tax revenues is declining.

— May 12, 2022
Printer-friendly version
What Changed in Alberta from the Fall 2021 Mid-year Update to Budget 2022

What Changed in Alberta from the Fall 2021 Mid-year Update to Budget 2022 is a new study that finds following a windfall in resource revenue, the recent Alberta budget increased program spending by $4 billion over the next three years. This increase in spending is above and beyond what would be required to keep pace with inflation and population growth.

— Feb 3, 2022
Printer-friendly version
A New Fiscal Framework for Alberta

A New Fiscal Framework for Alberta is a new study that finds rather than use precarious resource revenue to support high spending in Alberta, the Alberta Sustainability Fund (ASF) should be reintroduced and have contributions to the Heritage fund renewed to ensure long-term financial stability in the province.