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Steve Lafleur

Steve Lafleur is a former Senior Policy Analyst at the Fraser Institute. He holds an M.A. in Political Science from Wilfrid Laurier University and a B.A. from Laurentian University where he studied Political Science and Economics. He was previously a Senior Policy Analyst with the Frontier Centre for Public Policy in Winnipeg, and is a Contributing Editor to New Geography. His past work has focused primarily on housing, transportation, local government and inter-governmental fiscal relations. His current focus is on economic competitiveness of jurisdictions in the Prairie provinces.  His writing has appeared in every major national and regional Canadian newspaper and his work has been cited by many sources including the Partnership for a New American Economy and the Reason Foundation.

Recent Research by Steve Lafleur

— Mar 31, 2022
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Learning from Ontario’s Past

Learning from Ontario’s Past: How Ontario Can Avoid Another Post-Recession Debt Binge is a new study that focuses on how the provincial government could balance the budget by 2022/23, and what mistakes made by past governments should be avoided to ensure fiscal stability. Based on recent projections, the provincial government would need to reduce annual spending by $9.1 billion from its 2021/22 level to balance the budget in 2022/23—a 4.8 per cent decrease.

— Mar 10, 2022
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Four Myths about Economic Diversification in Alberta

Four Myths about economic diversification in Alberta is a new study that finds despite misperceptions, oil and gas production in the province does not dominate economic activity or employment in Alberta to the point that the provincial economy is notably less diversified than other provinces. In fact, with respect to employment, Alberta’s was the most diversified provincial economy in Canada in 2020.

— Feb 15, 2022
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The Age of Eligibility for Public Retirement Programs in the OECD: 2022 Update

Age of Eligibility for Public Retirement Programs in the OECD: 2022 Update is a new study that finds among 22 high-income countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), 16 have already increased (or are in the process of increasing) the age of eligibility for government retirement programs above 65. Canada has not, and as a result, will see increased provincial and federal spending on health care and income support for seniors.