Jake Fuss

Policy Analyst, Fraser Institute

Jake Fuss is a Policy Analyst at the Fraser Institute. He holds a Bachelor of Commerce and a Master’s Degree in Public Policy from the University of Calgary. Mr. Fuss has written commentaries appearing in major Canadian newspapers including the Financial Post and the Winnipeg Sun. His research covers a wide range of policy issues including government spending, debt, taxation, and charitable giving.

Recent Research by Jake Fuss

— Jan 22, 2019
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Prime Ministers and Government Spending, 2019 tracks annual per person program spending (adjusted for inflation) by prime ministers since Confederation, and finds that Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has now recorded two of the three years with the highest levels of government spending in Canadian history, including times of war and recession. The all-time high was recorded by Prime Minister Stephen Harper during the 2009 recession.

— Jan 3, 2019
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CEO to Worker Pay: Global Competition for Top Talent

CEO to Worker Pay: Global Competition for Top Talent finds that top business leaders—like top athletes, musicians and actors—receive high levels of compensation because they are in high demand around the world and not easily replaced. For example, Sean Combs (a.k.a. Diddy) was paid $130 million USD in 2017, the last year of comparable data. Likewise, Soccer player Cristiano Ronaldo earned $93 million USD, and actor Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson made $65 million USD. By comparison, the average compensation for the top 100 CEOs in Canada was $9.6 million CDN.

— Dec 20, 2018
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Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2018 Generosity Index

Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2018 Generosity Index finds that the amount of money Canadians donate to registered charities—as a share of their income—has plummeted 32.2 per cent since 2006, and Canadians remain far less generous than Americans. According to the index, Utah remains the most generous of all 64 jurisdictions in North America, and Manitoba is again the most generous Canadian province or territory, but still only ranks 42nd out of 64. Of the bottom-15 least generous jurisdictions in North America, 12 are Canadian.