Milagros Palacios

Associate Director, Addington Centre for Measurement, Fraser Institute

Milagros Palacios is the Associate Director for the Addington Centre for Measurement at the Fraser Institute. She holds a B.S. in Industrial Engineering from the Pontifical Catholic University of Peru and a M.Sc. in Economics from the University of Concepcion, Chile. Ms. Palacios has studied public policy involving taxation, government finances, investment, productivity, labour markets, and charitable giving, for nearly 10 years. Since joining the Institute, Ms. Palacios has authored or coauthored over 70 comprehensive research studies, 70 commentaries and four books. Her recent commentaries have appeared in major Canadian newspapers such as the National Post, Toronto Sun, Windsor Star, and Vancouver Sun.

Recent Research by Milagros Palacios

— Nov 30, 2017
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Measuring the Distribution of Taxes in Canada

Measuring the Distribution of Taxes in Canada: Do the Rich Pay Their “Fair Share”? finds that the top 20 per cent of income earners in Canada will earn 49.1 per cent of all income in Canada this year, but pay 55.9 per cent of all taxes including not just income taxes, but payroll taxes, sales taxes and property taxes, among others.

— Nov 30, 2017
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Towards a Better Understanding of Income Inequality in Canada

Towards a Better Understanding of Income Inequality in Canada is a new book that finds the problem of inequality isn’t nearly as bad in Canada as people are sometimes led to believe. Canadians are more able, thanks to opportunities of mobility, to get out of a low-income situation, middle-class incomes are not stagnating and most people can and do build-up wealth over the course of their lives.

— Nov 8, 2017
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Effect of Federal Income Tax Changes on Canadian Families Who Are in the Bottom 20 Percent of Earners

Effect of Federal Income Tax Changes on Canadian Families Who Are in the Bottom 20 Percent of Earners finds that the federal government’s tax changes, implemented since the 2015 election, have raised income taxes for the majority (61 per cent) of taxpaying Canadian families in the bottom 20 per cent of earners, which includes families with children with incomes up to $66,448.