Nathaniel Li

Economist

Nathaniel Li is an Economist at the Fraser Institute. He holds a B.A. from the Fudan University in China and a Ph.D. in Food, Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of Guelph. Prior to joining the Fraser Institute, he worked for the University of Toronto as a postdoctoral fellow and the University of Guelph as a research associate. His past research work has been published in many high-quality, peer-reviewed academic journals, including the Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural EconomicsPreventive Medicine, and Canadian Public Policy. His current research covers a wide range of issues in fiscal, education, and labour-market policies.

Recent Research by Nathaniel Li

— Oct 14, 2021
Printer-friendly version
Prime Ministers and Government Spending: Updated 2021 Edition

Prime Ministers and Government Spending, Updated 2021 Edition is a new study that analyzes program spending by prime minister since Confederation, and finds that in 2020/21, federal program spending is expected to reach a minimum of $13,032 (inflation adjusted), which is 34.8 per cent higher than in 2019, pre-COVID, and 42.4 per cent higher than the level of spending recorded during 2009, a pronounced global recession.

— Sep 28, 2021
Printer-friendly version
An Assessment of Recent Economic Performance and Business Investment Growth in Ontario

An Assessment of Recent Economic Performance and Business Investment Growth in Ontario finds that the average rate of economic growth from 2000 to 2019 (excluding 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic) was weaker in Ontario than it was in the other large Canadian provinces. In fact, Ontario’s rate of business investment growth over the same period was the third lowest in Canada ahead of just New Brunswick and Nova Scotia.

— Sep 23, 2021
Printer-friendly version
The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2021

The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2021 finds that a typical Canadian family with an average household income of $150,177 will pay $15,039 for public health care this year, and that health-care costs have increased 177.6 per cent since 1997 compared to a 109.9 per cent increase in average incomes.