Sazid Hasan

Economist, Fraser Institute

Sazid Hasan is an economist at the Fraser Institute working on fiscal, health, and education policy. He received his M.A. in economics from Simon Fraser University. He also holds an M.S.S. and B.S.S. (honours), both in economics, from the University of Dhaka. He worked on his graduate project at the Research Data Centre of Statistics Canada, where he examined the impact of a tax credit on labour supply. He has presented his academic research at the annual conferences of Canadian Economics Association. His commentaries have appeared in the Vancouver Sun, Winnipeg Sun, and La Presse.

Recent Research by Sazid Hasan

— Dec 13, 2017
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Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2017 Generosity Index

Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2017 Generosity Index finds that the total amount donated to registered charities by Canadians—just 0.56 per cent of income—is the lowest amount in a decade and down from a 10-year peak of 0.78 per cent in 2006. By comparison, American tax-filers donated 1.76 per cent of their income to registered charities in 2015—more than three times the percentage Canadians claimed on their taxes.

— Oct 3, 2017
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The Funding and Regulation of Independent Schools in Canada

The Funding and Regulation of Independent Schools in Canada is a new, comprehensive catalogue of the different regulations and funding arrangements governing every independent school in Canada. Only five provinces—B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Quebec—provide partial funding to independent schools for operating costs ranging from 35 to 80 per cent per student, depending on the type of school and the degree to which it meets certain provincial regulations.

— Sep 21, 2017
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Comparing Performance of Universal Health Care Countries, 2017

Comparing Performance of Universal Health Care Countries, 2017 finds that Canada spends more on health care than almost every other comparable country with universal health care, but ranks near the bottom in the number of physicians and acute care beds—and suffers from the longest wait times.