Sazid Hasan

Economist, Fraser Institute

Sazid Hasan is an economist at the Fraser Institute working on fiscal, health, and education policy. He received his M.A. in economics from Simon Fraser University. He also holds an M.S.S. and B.S.S. (honours), both in economics, from the University of Dhaka. He worked on his graduate project at the Research Data Centre of Statistics Canada, where he examined the impact of a tax credit on labour supply. He has presented his academic research at the annual conferences of Canadian Economics Association. His commentaries have appeared in the Vancouver Sun, Winnipeg Sun, and La Presse.

Recent Research by Sazid Hasan

— May 23, 2018
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The Private Cost of Public Queues for Medically Necessary Care, 2018

The Private Cost of Public Queues for Medically Necessary Care, 2018 finds that Canada’s long wait times for medically necessary treatments cost Canadians $1.9 billion—or $1,822 per patient—in lost wages and time last year. Including the value of lost time outside the traditional work week—evenings and weekends—the estimated cost of waiting jumps to $5.8 billion.

— Jan 18, 2018
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The Supply of Physicians in Canada: Projections and Assessment

The Supply of Physicians in Canada: Projections and Assessment finds the number of doctors per capita in Canada lags far behind other developed countries in the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development, and Canada likely won’t close the gap in the coming years. In 2015, Canada had 2.7 doctors per 1,000 people—almost 20 per cent lower than the 3.4 per 1,000 person average for the OECD.

— Dec 13, 2017
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Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2017 Generosity Index

Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2017 Generosity Index finds that the total amount donated to registered charities by Canadians—just 0.56 per cent of income—is the lowest amount in a decade and down from a 10-year peak of 0.78 per cent in 2006. By comparison, American tax-filers donated 1.76 per cent of their income to registered charities in 2015—more than three times the percentage Canadians claimed on their taxes.