Labour Policy

— Mar 4, 2021
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Achieving the Four-Day Work Week: Essays on Improving Productivity Growth in Canada

Achieving the 4-Day Work Week: Essays on Improving Productivity Growth in Canada is a new essay series, authored by notable economists and analysts from across North America, that identifies and discusses a set of initiatives that promise to improve Canada’s labour productivity growth rate, which is essential to achieve a 4-day work week without sacrificing compensation. In broad terms, the initiatives identified in these essays promote faster productivity growth by encouraging more investment in physical and human capital, and by stimulating innovation and entrepreneurship.

— Mar 2, 2021
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Reforming Employment Insurance for the 21st Century

Reforming Employment Insurance for the 21st Century analyzes problems with Canada’s EI system, such as providing unequal benefits depending on where a worker lives, and not covering the self-employed or those who work in the growing ‘gig’ economy. The study also highlights several ways Canada’s employment insurance system could be reformed, including the idea of an Unemployment Insurance Savings Account.

— Feb 4, 2021
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Increasing Productivity Through Tax Reform

Increasing Productivity Through Tax Reform argues that if governments across Canada want to help increase productivity—and the possibility of a four-day work week—they should lower tax rates on business, capital gains and personal income.

— Jan 12, 2021
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Achieving the Four-Day Work Week: Part 3 Essays

Two new essays—The Drag on Productivity from Excessive Regulation, by researcher Laura Jones, chief strategic officer and executive vice-president of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), and The Importance of Labour Market Mobility to Productivity Growth by Fraser Institute senior fellow Robert P. Murphy—argues that governments could increase worker productivity and wages by eliminating undue labour market restrictions.

— Nov 12, 2020
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Achieving the Four-Day Work Week: Part 2 Essays

Two new essays—Towards a More Productive and United Canada: The Case for Liberalizing Interprovincial Trade by Trevor Tombe, associate professor of economics at the University of Calgary, and Barriers to Entry and Productivity Growth by Vincent Geloso, assistant professor of economics at King's University College—spotlight barriers to trade and competition, which can frustrate economic productivity and the possibility of a four-day work week.

— Oct 22, 2020
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Achieving the Four-Day Work Week

Two new essays—Putting Government on a Financial Diet: The Role of Statutory Fiscal Rules by Jack Mintz, president’s fellow at the University of Calgary, and Government Size and Economic Growth: An Overview by Livio Di Matteo, professor of economics at Lakehead University and a senior fellow at the Fraser Institute—note that the federal government’s budget deficit and mounting debt, and the overall size of government in Canada, will discourage economic productivity and the possibility of a four-day work week.

— Aug 13, 2020
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The Issues Facing Canada's Employment Insurance Program

The Issues Facing Canada’s Employment Insurance Program is a new study that finds the current design of Canada’s employment insurance program creates regional disparities, distorts labour markets, provides inadequate coverage for part-time workers and the self-employed, and will impose a financial burden on Canadians.

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