Labour Policy

— Aug 31, 2017
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Measuring Labour Markets in Canada and the United States: 2017 Edition

Measuring Labour Markets in Canada and the United States, 2017 finds that, overall, Canadian labour markets are being outperformed by their American counterparts with all but two Canadian provinces—Saskatchewan (15th) and B.C. (17th)—ranked in the bottom half of the 60 jurisdictions on the index.

— Jul 25, 2017
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The Economic Effects of Banning Temporary Replacement Workers

The Economic Effects of Banning Temporary Replacement Workers finds that prohibiting businesses from hiring temporary workers during strikes and lock-outs—as is the case in British Columbia and Quebec—discourages business investment, which in turn actually lowers union wages and costs jobs.

— Mar 9, 2017
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta, 2017

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Alberta finds that government employees in Alberta—including federal, provincial and municipal workers—receive 7.9 per cent higher wages, on average, than comparable workers in the private sector and also enjoy much more generous non-wage benefits.

— Mar 9, 2017
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Quebec, 2017

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Quebec finds that government employees in Quebec—including federal, provincial and municipal workers—receive 9.1 per cent higher wages, on average, than comparable workers in the private sector and also enjoy much more generous non-wage benefits.

— Feb 2, 2017
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Ontario, 2017

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in Ontario finds that government employees in Ontario—including federal, provincial and municipal workers—receive 13.4 per cent higher wages, on average, than comparable workers in the private sector and also enjoy much more generous non-wage benefits.

— Jan 12, 2017
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Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia

Comparing Government and Private Sector Compensation in British Columbia finds that government workers in B.C. receive 7.4 per cent higher wages, on average, than comparable workers in the private sector, and enjoy much more generous non-wage benefits, too. For example, nine-in-ten public sector workers have defined benefit pension plans, compared to just one-in-ten in the private sector. And government workers retire, on average, 2.5 years earlier.

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