Other Research Topics

— Nov 19, 2018
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The Flight of Capital From Canada

The Flight of Capital From Canada finds that a host of economic measures indicate that Canada continues to underperform when it comes to business investment, which is crucial for improving living standards and generating prosperity. Notably, from 2013 to 2017, Canadians increasingly invested abroad while at the same time, foreign direct investment in Canada dropped a staggering 55.1 per cent from 2013

— Nov 15, 2018
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Understanding Why Basic Auto Insurance Rates in BC Are So High

Understanding Why Basic Auto Insurance Rates in BC Are So High finds that drivers in British Columbia pay higher rates, in part, because ICBC doesn’t fully account for age when setting rates, so older, safer drivers pay more to subsidize younger, riskier drivers, who pay less than they otherwise would. Also, ICBC uses driver premiums to pay for non-insurance related costs—such as driver testing, driver and vehicle licensing and fine collection—which also drive up costs.

— Oct 23, 2018
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Natural Resource Regulation in Alberta

Natural Resource Regulation in Alberta finds that the province’s investment attractiveness has diminished in the eyes of oil, gas and mining executives, primarily due to the province’s increasing regulatory burden. Specifically, environmental regulations and the cost of complying with Alberta’s red tape are increasingly cited as reasons not to invest in the province.

— Oct 23, 2018
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Strategies for Deregulation: Concepts and Evidence

Strategies for Deregulation: Concepts and Evidence outlines how other jurisdictions—for example, British Columbia in 2001 and the federal government in 2015—successfully reduced outdated regulations. Best practices include broad public consultations to identify regulations for elimination, requiring a net reduction of existing regulations, and specifically tasking an independent agency or government department to reduce regulations.

— Oct 18, 2018
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The Consequences of Electoral Reform in British Columbia

The Consequences of Electoral Reform in British Columbia finds that changing the province’s voting system to a form of proportional representation, or PR, would lead to bigger costlier provincial governments. In fact, governments elected under PR systems are nearly 30 per cent bigger than governments elected under first-past-the-post, based on election data from 26 countries between 2004 and 2015 (the most recent year of comparable data).

— Sep 19, 2018
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Creating Policy Calling Cards to Attract Business to Ontario finds that major reforms in different policy areas are required to make the province “open for business,” as the new government has pledged. Suggested reforms include: cutting corporate and personal income taxes, reducing business subsidies, lowering electricity costs and reforming the province’s labour laws.

— Sep 6, 2018
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The Impact of Proportional Representation on British Columbia’s Legislature and Voters

The Impact of Proportional Representation on British Columbia’s Legislature and Voters finds that changing British Columbia’s voting system to a form of proportional representation would give rise to smaller, single-issue parties, lead to more coalition governments and increase uncertainty in Victoria, based on an analysis of election data from 30 countries between 2000 and 2017.