Government Spending & Taxes

— Jun 10, 2018
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This year Tax Freedom Day falls on June 10. Tax Freedom Day measures the total yearly tax burden imposed on Canadian families by all levels of government:  If you had to pay all your taxes up front, you’d give government every dollar you earned before June 10. This year, the average Canadian family (with two or more people) will pay $50,464 in total taxes or 43.6 per cent of its annual income.

— May 24, 2018
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The Decline of the Other Alberta Advantage: Debt Service Costs in Alberta Are Rising

The Decline of the Other Alberta Advantage: Debt Service Costs in Alberta Are Rising finds that every Albertan will pay, on average, $442 this year in interest on the province’s growing debt, compared to just $58 a decade ago. And if the province’s debt trend continues, debt-servicing costs may exceed $1,000 per person within the next 10 years.

— Apr 24, 2018
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Time for Tax Reform in Ontario

Time for Tax Reform in Ontario finds that if Ontario replaced its current seven-tier tax rate system with a single personal income tax rate of eight per cent and reduced its corporate income tax rate from 11.5 per cent to 8 per cent, it would be one of the most competitive pro-growth tax jurisdictions, which would help the province compete for business investment and skilled labour with neighbouring U.S. jurisdictions.

— Mar 27, 2018
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Why Is Alberta’s Deficit Still So Big?

Why Is Alberta’s Deficit Still So Big? finds that the province’s $8.8 billion deficit this year is not primarily due to low oil prices, but is largely a product of the Notley government’s spending decisions. In fact, if the current government had adhered to the spending plan it inherited from its predecessor laid out in the 2015 budget, the deficit today would be approximately $3 billion—less than half of the deficit actually posted in the recent provincial budget.

— Mar 22, 2018
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Subsidized Daycare—What British Columbia Can Learn from Quebec’s 20-Year Experiment

Subsidized Daycare—What British Columbia Can Learn from Quebec’s 20-Year Experiment finds that policymakers in B.C. should learn from Quebec’s government-subsidized daycare program, which has proven costly for taxpayers, has not paid for itself and has experienced mixed child development outcomes.

— Feb 23, 2018
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Back on Track: How the Federal Liberals Can Deliver Their Promised Balanced Budget by 2019/20

Back on Track: How the Federal Liberals Can Deliver Their Promised Balanced Budget by 2019/20 finds that a modest one per cent reduction in program spending—spread out over two years—would achieve budget balance. Incidentally, since coming into office in 2015, the federal Liberals have increased program spending by 20.1 per cent ($51 billion) in just three years.

— Feb 14, 2018
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Will British Columbia’s New NDP Government Abandon Past Spending Discipline?

Will B.C.’s New NDP Government Abandon Past Spending Discipline? finds that British Columbia currently enjoys one of the strongest fiscal positions in Canada because of modest spending growth. In fact, over a 15-year period starting in 2001/02, successive provincial governments in B.C. increased spending, on average, 3.5 per cent annually—the lowest level of spending growth during that time period of any province.

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