Government Spending & Taxes

— Nov 19, 2018
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The Flight of Capital From Canada

The Flight of Capital From Canada finds that a host of economic measures indicate that Canada continues to underperform when it comes to business investment, which is crucial for improving living standards and generating prosperity. Notably, from 2013 to 2017, Canadians increasingly invested abroad while at the same time, foreign direct investment in Canada dropped a staggering 55.1 per cent from 2013.

— Oct 11, 2018
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Capital Investment in Canada: An International Comparison

Capital Investment in Canada: An International Comparison finds that Canada’s anemic growth rate of capital investment—which has slowed to a 40-year low—has lagged behind growth rates in the United States and other developed countries in recent years. Investment growth has been especially weak in Canada’s business sector, particularly in the areas of machinery, equipment and intellectual property.

— Sep 19, 2018
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Impact of Provincial Tax Changes on British Columbian Families

Impact of Provincial Tax Changes on British Columbian Families finds that the average family in British Columbia—with a 2018 household income of $114,809—will pay $969 more a year in taxes due to the B.C. government’s recent tax changes. Crucially, that figure does not include several residential property tax increases, such as the increased property transfer taxes, the foreign buyers tax, the speculation tax and the school tax.

— Sep 13, 2018
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Capital Investment in Canada: Recent Behaviour and Implications

Capital Investment in Canada: Recent Behaviour and Implications finds that the growth rate of overall investments in Canada—particularly in the important areas of equipment, machinery and intellectual property—has slowed to a 40-year low, negatively affecting living standards for workers and overall economic growth.

— Aug 21, 2018
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Restoring Ontario's Public Finances

Restoring Ontario’s Public Finances finds that Ontario’s new provincial government can balance the budget and even cut taxes, but doing so will require a focus on spending discipline. In fact, a five per cent reduction in spending from 2017/18 levels would achieve a balanced budget by 2020/21—years earlier than the 2024/25 timeline set by the previous government—and also free up $21 billion in fiscal room, which could be used to reduce taxes.

— Aug 14, 2018
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Canadian Consumer Tax Index 2018 finds that last year the average Canadian family spent 43 per cent of its income on taxes, more than housing, food and clothing costs combined, which made up just 35.6 per cent. The annual study tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian household from 1961 to 2017, and looks at both visible and hidden taxes that families pay to the federal, provincial and local governments, including income, payroll, sales, property, health, fuel and alcohol taxes, and more.

— Jul 10, 2018
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The Effects on Entrepreneurship of Increasing Provincial Top Personal Income Tax Rates in Canada

The Effects on Entrepreneurship of Increasing Provincial Top Personal Income Tax Rates in Canada finds that many provincial governments across Canada are discouraging entrepreneurship and preventing hundreds of new businesses from being created by increasing top provincial personal income tax rates, which reduces the incentives for entrepreneurs to start new businesses.

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