Pensions and Retirement

The federal government and several provinces want to expand the Canada Pension Plan. If they do, working Canadians will be contributing more to the CPP. But the arguments favouring CPP expansion are based on some incorrect (or at least, debatable) claims. Here are the five common claims used to argue for CPP expansion—and why they are myths that must be refuted.

— Jul 14, 2016
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Rates of return for expanded CPP remain meagre

The provinces and the federal government have reached an agreement in principle on Canada Pension Plan expansion, with ratification of the agreement expected this week. But despite an expanded CPP, workers in Canada—particularly younger workers—will still receive a meagre rate of return from their CPP contributions.

— Jun 2, 2016
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Expanding the Canada Pension Plan Will Not Help Canada's Most Financially Vulnerable Seniors

Expanding the Canada Pension Plan Will Not Help Canada's Most Financially Vulnerable Seniors finds that seniors living alone — especially single seniors with limited or no work history  — are the most financially vulnerable in retirement, and that an expansion of the Canada Pension Plan won’t benefit them.

— May 5, 2016
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Rates of Return for the Canada Pension Plan

Amid the ongoing debates about expanding the CPP, the study, Rates of Return for the Canada Pension Plan, calculates the rates of return Canadians can expect in return from the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). The study finds that, contrary to widely held public opinion, the CPP provides only a meager rate of return for most Canadian workers—especially younger workers.

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