Aging, Retirement, and Pensions

— Jul 28, 2022
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An Aging Population: The Demographic Drag on Canada’s Labour Market

An Aging Population: The Demographic Drag on Canada’s Labour Market is a new study that finds the employment rate for Canadians between 15 and 64 years of age (working age) is at a historic high, but the overall labour market has yet to fully recover from the pandemic-induced recession due to the continued aging of the country’s population.

— May 26, 2022
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Understanding the Changing Ratio of Working-Age Canadians to Seniors and Its Consequences

Understanding the Changing Ratio of Working-Age Canadians to Seniors and Its Consequences is a new study that finds as Canada’s population ages, the number of working-aged Canadians relative to the number of seniors has declined from 5.4 in 2000 to 3.4 in 2022, which means government spending related to seniors is increasing at the same time that the growth in tax revenues is declining.

— Apr 21, 2022
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Barriers to the Labour Force Participation of Older Workers in Canada

Barriers to the Labour Force Participation of Older Workers in Canada finds that if governments in Canada want to help seniors who want to continue working, they should remove barriers that discourage them from remaining in the workforce.

— Feb 15, 2022
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The Age of Eligibility for Public Retirement Programs in the OECD: 2022 Update

Age of Eligibility for Public Retirement Programs in the OECD: 2022 Update is a new study that finds among 22 high-income countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), 16 have already increased (or are in the process of increasing) the age of eligibility for government retirement programs above 65. Canada has not, and as a result, will see increased provincial and federal spending on health care and income support for seniors.

— Nov 30, 2021
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The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Alberta

The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Alberta is a new study that finds health-care expenditures in the province will increase by an estimated 5.6 per cent annually (on average) over the next 20 years, and as a result of Alberta’s changing demographics, the province may not balance its budget until at least 2040/41 unless it makes changes to its spending.

— Nov 30, 2021
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The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in the Prairies

The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in the Prairies is a new study that finds health-care expenditures in Saskatchewan and Manitoba will increase by an estimated 5.4 per cent and 4.9 per cent annually (respectively, on average) over the next 20 years, and as a result of the provinces’ changing demographics, they may not balance their budgets until at least 2040/41 unless changes to spending are made.

— Nov 30, 2021
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The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Atlantic Canada

The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Atlantic Canada is a new study that finds health-care expenditures in the region will increase 4.2 per cent in New Brunswick, 4.7 per cent in Nova Scotia, 5.1 per cent in Newfoundland & Labrador, and 5.6 per cent in Prince Edward Island annually (on average) over the next 20 years. As a result of the region’s changing demographics, none may balance their budget until at least 2040/41 unless changes are made to spending.

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