Kristina Lybecker

Associate Professor of Economics, Colorado College

Kristina Lybecker, Senior Fellow at the Fraser Institute, is an Associate Professor of Economics at Colorado College in Colorado Springs. Her research focuses largely on issues related to intellectual property (IP) rights protection with a particular focus on pharmaceutical-related IP.

Prof. Lybecker's recent publications include an evaluation of Canada's IP protection for pharmaceutical products based on international best practices, as well as examinations of alternatives to the existing patent system and the balance between pharmaceutical patent protection and access to essential medicines. She has testified in more than a dozen U.S. states on the economics of pharmaceutical counterfeiting and at the recent Trans-Pacific Partnership trade negotiations on the economics of access to medicine. Prof. Lybecker has also worked with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the OECD, and the World Bank on issues of innovation and international trade.

She earned a B.A. from Macalester College and received her Ph.D. in Economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Recent Research by Kristina Lybecker

— Jan 24, 2017
Printer-friendly version
Intellectual Property Rights Protection and the Biopharmaceutical Industry: How Canada Measures Up

Intellectual Property Rights Protection and the Biopharmaceutical Industry: How Canada Measures Up finds that Canada’s inadequate patent protections for pharmaceuticals are hampering innovation and economic growth. In fact, between 2001 and 2015, biopharmaceutical research and development spending in Canada declined by 20 per cent.

— Oct 14, 2016
Printer-friendly version
Intellectual Property Rights and the Promotion of Biologics, Medical Devices, and Trade in Pharmaceuticals

Intellectual Property Rights and the Promotion of Biologics, Medical Devices, and Trade in Pharmaceuticals finds that if patent protections for drugs and medical devices were strengthened around the world, it could ultimately lower costs in Canada and help save lives by spurring innovation. And until stronger patent protections are established around the world, developed countries should streamline cross-border regulations for pharmaceuticals and medical devices, which would help reduce prices for patients and health-care systems.

— Jul 12, 2016
Printer-friendly version
Biologics Revolution in the Production of Drugs

The Biologics Revolution in the Production of Drugs, spotlights the emerging science of biologic medicines, which involve genetically engineering living cells to produce needed proteins. Biologics have shown great promise in the treatment, diagnosis and prevention of more than 250 diseases including a variety of cancers. The study finds that Canada’s protection of intellectual property (IP) for biologic medicines lags behind other countries, limiting access and stunting investment.