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Bacchus Barua

Senior Economist, Health Policy Studies, Fraser Institute

Bacchus Barua is a Senior Economist in the Fraser Institute’s Centre for Health Policy Studies. He completed his BA (Honours) in Economics at the University of Delhi (Ramjas College) and received an MA in Economics from Simon Fraser University. Bacchus has conducted research on a range of key health care topics including hospital performance, access to new pharmaceuticals, the impact of aging on health care expenditures, and international comparisons of health care systems. He also designed the Provincial Healthcare Index (2013) and is the lead author of The Effect of Wait Times on Mortality in Canada, and Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada (2010–2014).

Recent Research by Bacchus Barua

— Aug 1, 2017
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The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2017 edition

The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2017 finds that a typical Canadian family of four will pay $12,057 for health care this year—an increase of nearly 70 per cent over the last 20 years.

— May 18, 2017
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 Private Cost of Public Queues for Medically Necessary Care 2017

The Private Cost of Public Queues for Medically Necessary Care, 2017 finds that Canada’s long wait times for medically necessary treatments cost Canadians $1.7 billion—or $1,759 per patient—in lost wages and time last year. Including the value of lost time outside the traditional work week—evenings and weekends—the estimated cost of waiting jumps from $1.7 billion to $5.2 billion.

— Mar 14, 2017
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Sustainability of Health Care Spending in Canada 2017

The Sustainability of Health Care Spending in Canada 2017 finds that health-care spending by provincial governments has increased by 116 per cent since 2001 and is projected to keep growing over the next 15 years. In fact, by 2031, health-care spending is projected to consume 42.6 per cent of all provincial program spending (on average), up from 40.1 per cent in 2016 and 37.6 percent in 2001.