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Bacchus Barua

Associate Director, Health Policy Studies, Fraser Institute

Bacchus Barua is Associate Director of the Fraser Institute’s Centre for Health Policy Studies. He completed his BA (Honours) in Economics at the University of Delhi (Ramjas College) and received an MA in Economics from Simon Fraser University. Bacchus has conducted research on a range of key health care topics including hospital performance, access to new pharmaceuticals, the impact of aging on health care expenditures, and international comparisons of health care systems. He also designed the Provincial Healthcare Index (2013) and is the lead author of The Effect of Wait Times on Mortality in Canada, and Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada (2010–2014).

Recent Research by Bacchus Barua

— May 23, 2018
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The Private Cost of Public Queues for Medically Necessary Care, 2018

The Private Cost of Public Queues for Medically Necessary Care, 2018 finds that Canada’s long wait times for medically necessary treatments cost Canadians $1.9 billion—or $1,822 per patient—in lost wages and time last year. Including the value of lost time outside the traditional work week—evenings and weekends—the estimated cost of waiting jumps to $5.8 billion.

— May 1, 2018
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Is the Canada Health Act a Barrier to Reform?

Is the Canada Health Act a Barrier to Reform? finds that the provinces are discouraged from implementing proven health-care reforms that would improve the system and shorten wait times because of the Canada Health Act, which not only sets the rules around cash transfers from Ottawa to the provinces for health care, but also allows the federal government to withhold funds from any province deemed in violation of the Act.

— Mar 20, 2018
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How Canadian Health Care Differs from Other Systems

How Canadian Health Care Differs from Other Systems finds that Canada’s approach to health policy is much more restrictive than in other developed countries with more successful universal health-care systems, notably on the use of the private sector and patient cost-sharing. This is the first in a two-part series on the Canada Health Act.