Steven Globerman

Resident Scholar and Addington Chair in Measurement, Professor Emeritus, Western Washington University

Mr. Steven Globerman is Resident Scholar and Addington Chair in Measurement at the Fraser Institute as well as Professor Emeritus at Western Washington University. Previously, he held tenured appointments at Simon Fraser University and York University and has been a visiting professor at the University of California, University of British Columbia, Stockholm School of Economics, Copenhagen School of Business, and the Helsinki School of Economics.

He has published more than 150 articles and monographs and is the author of the book The Impacts of 9/11 on Canada-U.S. Trade as well as a textbook on international business management. In the early 1990s, he was responsible for coordinating Fraser Institute research on the North American Free Trade Agreement.

In addition, Mr. Globerman has served as a researcher for two Canadian Royal Commissions on the economy as well as a research advisor to Investment Canada on the subject of foreign direct investment. He has also hosted management seminars for policymakers across North America and Asia.

Mr. Globerman was a founding member of the Association for Cultural Economics and is currently a member of the American and Canadian Economics Associations, the Academy of International Business, and the Academy of Management.

He earned his BA in economics from Brooklyn College, his MA from the University of California, Los Angeles, and his PhD from New York University.

Recent Research by Steven Globerman

— Mar 21, 2019
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Canadian Foreign Direct Investment: Recent Patterns and Interpretation

Canadian Foreign Direct Investment: Recent Patterns and Interpretation finds that the amount invested by Canadians abroad has increased 73.7 per cent since 2013, while the amount invested by foreigners in Canada over the same time period has declined by 55 per cent, signalling Canada has become a less attractive place to invest over the past few years.

— Jan 24, 2019
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Pharmaceutical Regulation, Innovation, and Access to New Drugs: An International Perspective

Pharmaceutical Regulation, Innovation, and Access to New Drugs: An International Perspective finds that the federal government’s plan to lower prescription drug prices through changes to the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board could impede access of new life-saving drugs for Canadian patients and even discourage innovation in the pharmaceutical sector.

— Jan 15, 2019
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Innovation in Canada: An Assessment of Recent Experience

Innovation in Canada: An Assessment of Recent Experience finds that Canada's innovation performance has declined in recent years and is falling further behind the U.S. and other developed countries, despite decades of costly innovation programs by successive federal governments. Innovation—developing new products or new ways of doing things—is key to increasing productivity and raising living standards for all Canadians.