Environment

— Nov 16, 2017
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Canada’s Climate Action Plans: Are They Cost-effective?

Canada’s Climate Action Plans: Are they cost-effective? finds that current provincial plans will cost Canadians billions and likely produce very little environmental benefits, based on a detailed review of provincial climate action plans and results from countries and other jurisdictions around the world that have pursued similar policies.

— May 4, 2017
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Poor Implementation Undermines Carbon Tax Efficiency in Canada

Poor Implementation Undermines Carbon Tax Efficiency in Canada finds that the theoretical benefits of carbon taxes and cap-and-trade schemes—that they can lower emissions and improve the economy at the same time—are negated by poor implementation such as layering these schemes on top of, instead of replacing existing regulations.

— Apr 20, 2017
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Canada's Air Quality Since 1970: An Environmental Success Story

Canada's Air Quality Since 1970: An Environmental Success Story finds that levels of four major air pollutants—ground-level ozone, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and carbon monoxide—have all fallen substantially since the 1970s despite significant population and economic growth and increased energy usage over the same time.

— Jan 17, 2017
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Did the Coal Phase-out Reduce Ontario Air Pollution?

Did the Coal Phase-out Reduce Ontario Air Pollution finds that the coal phase-out produced only a small reduction in fine particulates, a common measure of air pollution, and in Toronto and Hamilton, the reduction was statistically insignificant. In fact, had the province completed its modernization of the coal-fired plants, instead of shutting them down, fine particulate reductions of the same size could have been achieved at a much lower cost.

— May 28, 2015
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The Principle of Targeting in Energy and Environmental Policy

The Principle of Targeting in Energy and Environmental Policy spotlights the effectiveness of energy and environmental regulations implemented by governments throughout Canada in recent years.  While championing the economic principle of ‘targeting’, the study finds that many of the applied regulations – such as bans on plastics bags, prohibitions against 100-watt incandescent light bulbs, household appliance standards and ethanol blending mandates – are inefficient, costly and do little to improve the environment.

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