Ashley Stedman

Policy Analyst, Fraser Institute

Ashley Stedman is a policy analyst working in the Centre for Natural Resources. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from Carleton University and a Master of Public Policy from the University of Calgary. Prior to joining the Fraser Institute, she held positions with the MacDonald-Laurier Institute, Manning Centre, and the Canadian Federation of Independent Business. Her graduate research examined the impact of online activism on the Keystone XL pipeline project. Ms. Stedman also published a research report on municipal spending trends across Alberta, which received extensive local media coverage.

Recent Research by Ashley Stedman

— Nov 28, 2017
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Global Petroleum Survey 2017

The 2017 Global Petroleum Survey finds that British Columbia now ranks as the least-attractive Canadian province for oil and gas investment—followed by Alberta. In this year’s global survey, which was conducted after the provincial election, B.C. ranks 76th out of the 97 jurisdictions and earned low marks for political stability and a high cost of regulatory compliance. Alberta ranks 33rd. Newfoundland and Labrador was the most attractive Canadian province for oil and gas investment, and ranks 4th worldwide. Texas is the most attractive jurisdiction globally for oil and gas investment, followed by Oklahoma.

— Nov 15, 2017
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The Impact of Interprovincial Migration of Seniors on Provincial Health Care Spending

The Impact of Interprovincial Migration of Seniors on Provincial Health Care Spending finds that migrating seniors have increased B.C.’s health-care costs by more than $7.0 billion over the past 36 years, while effectively saving Quebec $6.0 billion. That’s because Canadians pay most of their lifetime taxes during their working lives, but consume most of their health-care costs after they retire. B.C. and five other provinces saw a net inflow of seniors since 1980, while Quebec and the other provinces saw a net outflow.

— Jul 20, 2017
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Evaluating Electricity Price Growth in Ontario

Evaluating Electricity Price Growth in Ontario finds that hydro prices in Ontario increased twice as fast as the national average over the past decade, and the average Toronto resident now pays $60 more per month than the average Canadian for electricity.