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Provincial Drug Coverage for Vulnerable Canadians

Provincial Drug Coverage for Vulnerable Canadians finds that every province already provides prescription drug coverage to help Canadians—particularly seniors and lower-income Canadians—pay for pharmaceuticals. Crucially, provinces are able to establish prescription drug plans to suit their particular priorities, population age, income levels and other factors, which differ from province to province. This customization would likely be lost or at least diluted if Canada adopts a national pharmacare program.

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Capital Investment in Canada: An International Comparison

Capital Investment in Canada: An International Comparison finds that Canada’s anemic growth rate of capital investment—which has slowed to a 40-year low—has lagged behind growth rates in the United States and other developed countries in recent years. Investment growth has been especially weak in Canada’s business sector, particularly in the areas of machinery, equipment and intellectual property.

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Electricity Reform in Ontario: Getting Power Prices Down

Electricity Reform in Ontario: Getting Power Prices Down finds that the Ontario government could reduce current electricity prices for Ontarians by 24 per cent by either cancelling or renegotiating existing contracts with wind and solar-power generators. These contracts represent almost 40 per cent of the Global Adjustment charge on Ontarians’ hydro bills while providing just seven per cent of the province’s total electricity generation.

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Increasing the Minimum Wage in Alberta: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy

Increasing the Minimum Wage in Alberta: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy finds that raising Alberta’s minimum wage will do little to reduce poverty because 92 per cent of minimum-wage earners in the province don’t live in low-income households. In fact, half of the province’s minimum-wage earners are under the age of 24, almost all of whom live with their parents.

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Economic Freedom of the World: 2018 Annual Report

Economic Freedom of the World: 2018 Annual Report is the world’s premier measurement of economic freedom, ranking countries based on five areas: size of government, legal structure and security of property rights, access to sound money, freedom to trade internationally, and regulation of credit, labour and business. This year’s report compares 162 countries and territories. In this year’s ranking, which is based on 2016 data, Hong Kong is again number one, and Canada (tied for 10th with Australia) trails the United States, which ranks 6th.

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Creating Policy Calling Cards to Attract Business to Ontario finds that major reforms in different policy areas are required to make the province “open for business,” as the new government has pledged. Suggested reforms include: cutting corporate and personal income taxes, reducing business subsidies, lowering electricity costs and reforming the province’s labour laws.

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Impact of Provincial Tax Changes on British Columbian Families

Impact of Provincial Tax Changes on British Columbian Families finds that the average family in British Columbia—with a 2018 household income of $114,809—will pay $969 more a year in taxes due to the B.C. government’s recent tax changes. Crucially, that figure does not include several residential property tax increases, such as the increased property transfer taxes, the foreign buyers tax, the speculation tax and the school tax.

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Capital Investment in Canada: Recent Behaviour and Implications

Capital Investment in Canada: Recent Behaviour and Implications finds that the growth rate of overall investments in Canada—particularly in the important areas of equipment, machinery and intellectual property—has slowed to a 40-year low, negatively affecting living standards for workers and overall economic growth.