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An Evaluation of the Proposed PMPRB Amendments

An Evaluation of the Proposed PMPRB Amendments is a new study that finds Ottawa's amendments to the Patented Medicines Regulations and subsequent drug-pricing changes may result in lower costs, but will also likely reduce Canadians’ access to life-saving pharmaceuticals and potentially discourage investment in Canada’s pharmaceutical sector.

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Comparing per-Person Spending and Revenue in Metro Vancouver, 2009–2019

Comparing Per Person Spending and Revenue in Metro Vancouver, 2009-2019 is a new study that finds per-person spending has increased across all 17 Metro Vancouver municipalities by 15.2 per cent between 2009 and 2019, after accounting for inflation. Not surprisingly, there is a connection between high spending municipalities and high tax municipalities, as West Vancouver, the highest spending municipality, was also the 2nd highest taxed municipality in 2019, and New Westminster and the City of Vancouver also ranked highly in both spending per person and per person revenues.

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The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2022

The Price of Public Healthcare, 2022 finds that a typical Canadian family with an average household income of $156,086 will pay $15,847 for public health care this year, and that health-care costs have increased 210.3 per cent since 1997 compared to a 116.3 per cent increase in average incomes.

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Ford Government Plans to Outspend Wynne Government

Ford Government Plans to Outspend Wynne Government finds that, despite any rhetoric to the contrary, the current Ontario government plans to outspend its predecessor.

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Alberta Premiers and Government Spending

Alberta Premiers and Government Spending finds that from 1965 to 2020, the highest level of per-person provincial government spending (adjusted for inflation) in Alberta occurred in 2017—three years before the pandemic.

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An Aging Population: The Demographic Drag on Canada’s Labour Market

An Aging Population: The Demographic Drag on Canada’s Labour Market is a new study that finds the employment rate for Canadians between 15 and 64 years of age (working age) is at a historic high, but the overall labour market has yet to fully recover from the pandemic-induced recession due to the continued aging of the country’s population.

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Doing Business 2.0: A Better Guide for Policy Makers

Doing Business 2.0: A Better Guide for Policy Makers argues that when the World Bank cancelled its Doing Business report last year, it created a massive information void for economists and governments seeking to spur economic growth and reduce poverty.

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Promoting Capital Investment in Atlantic Canada: An Imperative for Prosperity

Promoting Capital Investment in Atlantic Canada: An Imperative for Prosperity is a new study that finds business investment in the three maritime provinces has been below the average for the rest of Canada since at least 1990, and that has contributed significantly to the region’s slow economic growth and lower living standard.