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Ben Eisen

Director, Provincial Prosperity Studies, Fraser Institute

Ben Eisen is the Director of Provincial Prosperity Studies at the Fraser Institute. He holds a BA from the University of Toronto and an MPP from the University of Toronto’s School of Public Policy and Governance. Prior to joining the Fraser Institute Mr. Eisen was the Director of Research and Programmes at the Atlantic Institute for Market Studies in Halifax.  He also worked for the Citizens Budget Commission in New York City, and in Winnipeg as the Assistant Research Director for the Frontier Centre for Public Policy. Mr. Eisen has published influential studies on several policy topics, including intergovernmental relations, public finance, and higher education policy. He has been widely quoted in major newspapers including the National Post, Chronicle Herald, Winnipeg Free Press and Calgary Herald.

Recent Research by Ben Eisen

— Mar 30, 2017
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Hold the Celebration

Hold the Celebration: A Balanced Budget Won’t End Ontario’s Fiscal Challenges finds that Ontario’s debt is expected to continue to grow—increasing by approximately $9 billion next year—despite the government’s promise to finally balance its budget next month. Currently, Ontario’s debt relative to the size of the provincial economy stands at approximately 40 per cent and is expected to hover close to this historically high level for the foreseeable future.

— Mar 28, 2017
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Quebec’s Daycare Program: A Flawed Policy Model

Quebec’s Daycare Program: A Flawed Policy Model finds that the province’s 20-year-old subsidized daycare program has produced skyrocketing costs along with worrying child development outcomes without eliminating wait times. Spending on a per-child basis—after adjusting for inflation—jumped 101.6 per cent since the program’s creation, from $4,874 in 1997 to $9,823 in 2016 (amounts in 2016 dollars).

— Jan 26, 2017
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Alberta's Budget Deficit: Why Spending is to Blame, 2017

Alberta’s Budget Deficit: Why Spending Is To Blame, 2017 finds that the Alberta government could have posted a small budget surplus this year instead of a $10.8 billion deficit if successive governments had kept program spending increases in line with population growth and inflation.