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Ben Eisen

Director, Provincial Prosperity Studies, Fraser Institute

Ben Eisen is the Director of Provincial Prosperity Studies at the Fraser Institute. He holds a BA from the University of Toronto and an MPP from the University of Toronto’s School of Public Policy and Governance. Prior to joining the Fraser Institute Mr. Eisen was the Director of Research and Programmes at the Atlantic Institute for Market Studies in Halifax.  He also worked for the Citizens Budget Commission in New York City, and in Winnipeg as the Assistant Research Director for the Frontier Centre for Public Policy. Mr. Eisen has published influential studies on several policy topics, including intergovernmental relations, public finance, and higher education policy. He has been widely quoted in major newspapers including the National Post, Chronicle Herald, Winnipeg Free Press and Calgary Herald.

Recent Research by Ben Eisen

— Sep 19, 2017
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Ontario Enters Uncharted Waters with a $15 Minimum Wage

Ontario Enters Uncharted Waters with a $15 Minimum Wage finds that raising Ontario’s minimum wage to $15 an hour—a staggering 32 per cent increase over the current minimum wage—will lead to job losses across the province for Ontario’s young and low-skilled workers, especially outside Toronto.

— Sep 7, 2017
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Canada’s Past Fiscal Leaders Are Now Fiscal Laggards: An Analysis of 2017 Provincial Budgets

Canada’s Past Fiscal Leaders Are Now Fiscal Laggards: An Analysis of 2017 Provincial Budgets finds that Ontario and Alberta, which once boasted of having strong fiscal records, are now among the country’s most unsuccessful financial managers. And Quebec and Saskatchewan, which have both struggled in the past as weak fiscal performers, are now pursuing policies that are gradually improving the condition of their public finances.

— Aug 22, 2017
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Should Equalization Keep On Growing in an Era of Converging Fiscal Capacity

Should Equalization Keep on Growing in an Era of Converging Fiscal Capacity? finds that, as traditional “have” provinces struggle economically, Canada’s equalization program is not equipped to adapt to the country’s new economic landscape. In fact, a rule introduced to cap equalization increases to ensure program affordability could actually add as much as $2.7 billion to program costs over the next two years.