Christopher A. Sarlo

Professor of Economics, Nipissing University

Christopher A. Sarlo is professor of economics at Nipissing University in North Bay, Ontario, as well as a senior fellow with the Fraser Institute. He is the author of Poverty in Canada (Fraser Institute, 1992, 1996), Measuring Poverty in Canada (Fraser Institute, 2001, 2006), and What is Poverty? Providing Clarity for Canada (Fraser Institute, 2008).  Some of his recent publications include Understanding Wealth Inequality in Canada, Consumption Inequality in Canada: Is the Gap Growing?, Child Care in Canada: Examining the Status Quo in 2015, and Income Inequality Measurement Sensitivities. Professor Sarlo has published a number of articles and studies on poverty, inequality and economic issues relating to the family.

Recent Research by Christopher A. Sarlo

— Oct 7, 2021
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Does the Canada Child Benefit Actually Reduce Child Poverty?

Does the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) Actually Reduce Child Poverty? is a new study that finds the Canada Child Benefit is less effective than the government claims at lifting children out of poverty due to a lack of targeting. In fact, despite spending an additional $5.6 billion in 2019-20, the new Canada Child Benefit only moved an estimated 90,900 children above Statistics Canada’s Low-Income Cut-Off, a key measure of low-income.

— Nov 26, 2020
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The Distribution of the Canada Child Benefit by Family Type and Income Level

The Distribution of the Canada Child Benefit by Family Type and Income Level, part three of an essay series on the Canada Child Benefit (CCB), finds that families with between $100,000 and $120,000 of annual household income received (on average) roughly the same increase in cash benefits from the new CCB program than families with less than $20,000 of income.

— Oct 6, 2020
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Is the Canada Child Benefit Targeted to those Most in Need?

Is the Canada Child Benefit Targeted to those Most in Need?, part one of an essay series on the Canada Child Benefit (CCB), finds that families with less than $40,000 of annual household income receive 16.2 per cent of total benefits from the CCB program—compared to 21.8 per cent under two child benefit programs scrapped by the federal government in 2016.