Ergete Ferede

Professor of Economics, MacEwan University

Ergete Ferede is Professor of Economics at MacEwan University in Edmonton, where he has held an academic appointment since 2006. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Alberta. He has previously taught at Addis Ababa University (Ethiopia), University of Alberta, and University of Windsor. Dr. Ferede has been actively engaged in research on taxation policy and intergovernmental grants. He also conducts research on the efficiency costs of taxes, the effects of taxes on various economic activities, corporate income-tax policy, and tax reform. His research has been published in the National Tax Journal, International Tax and Public Finance, Small Business Economics, and Public Finance Review.

Recent Research by Ergete Ferede

— Apr 15, 2021
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Will Cutting Income Tax Rates Create Jobs for Canadians?

Will Cutting Income Taxes Create Jobs for Canadians? is a new study that finds if the federal government reduced the top personal income tax rate from 33 per cent back down to 29 per cent (the rate before the 2016 tax hike), it would facilitate the creation of approximately 110,000 private-sector jobs the following year.

— Aug 6, 2020
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Who Bears the Burden of British Columbia’s Employer Health Tax?

Who Bears the Burden of British Columbia’s Employer Health Tax? Finds that B.C.’s new “health tax,” which essentially replaced the province’s Medical Services Plan (MSP), will cost the average worker nearly $3,000 per year in foregone wages.

— Jul 14, 2020
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The Revenue Effects of Rescinding Ontario's Tax Rate Hike on High-Income Earners

The Revenue Effects of Rescinding Ontario’s Tax Rate Hike on High-income Earners finds that lowering the province’s top personal income tax rate from the current 20.53 per cent back to 17.41 per cent—where it was prior to a so-called “temporary” rate hike in 2012—would only cost the government $26 million in the first year in foregone tax revenues, thanks to increased economic activity. And lowering the province’s top personal income tax rate would significantly increase Ontario’s attractiveness for investment, entrepreneurs and high-skilled workers.