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Josef Filipowicz

Senior Policy Analyst, Fraser Institute

Josef Filipowicz is a Senior Policy Analyst in the Centre for Municipal Studies at the Fraser Institute. He holds an M.A. in Political Science from Wilfrid Laurier University, and a Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning from Ryerson University. His work with the Fraser Institute includes the New Homes and Red Tape series focusing on the regulatory landscape surrounding home-building in Canada’s municipalities, as well as analysis of the impact land-use regulation has on the housing supply in Canada’s largest cities. Mr. Filipowicz’s work has been featured in news outlets including the Wall Street Journal, Globe and Mail, National Post, Toronto Star, and Vancouver Sun. He continues to work on urban issues including housing, municipal finance, and governance.

Recent Research by Josef Filipowicz

— Jan 9, 2018
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Room to Grow: Comparing Urban Density in Canada and Abroad

Room to Grow: Comparing Urban Density in Canada and Abroad compares population densities in 30 metropolitan centres in high-income developed countries, and finds that Canadian cities—including Toronto and Vancouver, which are experiencing an affordability crunch—can accommodate much more housing supply as they have much lower population densities than other major urban centres around the world.

— Aug 17, 2017
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Interest Rates and Mortgage Borrowing Power in Canada

Interest Rates and Mortgage Borrowing Power in Canada finds that the ability of Canadians to borrow for a home has increased 126 per cent over the past two decades because of declining interest rates and rising incomes, likely driving up prices.

— Apr 27, 2017
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New Homes and Red Tape in British Columbia 2017

New Homes and Red Tape in British Columbia: Residential Land-Use Regulation in the Lower Mainland finds that The City of Vancouver is the most heavily regulated municipality in the Lower Mainland for residential development and is stifling new homebuilding. The survey of homebuilders ranks 19 of the region’s municipalities when it comes to residential development regulations.