Printer-friendly version
Economic Freedom of North America 2017

Economic Freedom of North America 2017 finds that New Hampshire—the Live Free or Die state—has the highest level of economic freedom among all U.S. states for the third year in a row, scoring 8.3 out of 10 in this year’s report, which measures government spending, taxation and labour market restrictions. Florida, Texas, South Dakota and Tennessee round out the top five freest states. For the third year in a row New York was the least-free state in the country at 50th, and California ranked 49th.

Printer-friendly version
Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2017 Generosity Index

Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2017 Generosity Index finds that the total amount donated to registered charities by Canadians—just 0.56 per cent of income—is the lowest amount in a decade and down from a 10-year peak of 0.78 per cent in 2006. By comparison, American tax-filers donated 1.76 per cent of their income to registered charities in 2015—more than three times the percentage Canadians claimed on their taxes.

Printer-friendly version
Report Card on Ontario's Elementary Schools 2017

The Report Card on Ontario’s Elementary Schools—now in its 15th year—ranks more than 3,000 anglophone and francophone public and Catholic schools (and a small number of independent schools) based on nine academic indicators from results of annual province-wide reading, writing and math tests.

Printer-friendly version
Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada, 2017 Report

Waiting Your Turn: Wait Times for Health Care in Canada, 2017 finds that wait times for medically necessary treatment hit a new record in 2017 at 21.2 weeks—the longest ever recorded. The study, an annual survey of physicians from across Canada, finds Ontario again recorded the shortest wait time at 15.4 weeks—nearly four months—and New Brunswick recorded the longest wait time at 41.7 weeks.

Printer-friendly version
Measuring the Distribution of Taxes in Canada

Measuring the Distribution of Taxes in Canada: Do the Rich Pay Their “Fair Share”? finds that the top 20 per cent of income earners in Canada will earn 49.1 per cent of all income in Canada this year, but pay 55.9 per cent of all taxes including not just income taxes, but payroll taxes, sales taxes and property taxes, among others.

Printer-friendly version
Towards a Better Understanding of Income Inequality in Canada

Towards a Better Understanding of Income Inequality in Canada is a new book that finds the problem of inequality isn’t nearly as bad in Canada as people are sometimes led to believe. Canadians are more able, thanks to opportunities of mobility, to get out of a low-income situation, middle-class incomes are not stagnating and most people can and do build-up wealth over the course of their lives.

Printer-friendly version
Global Petroleum Survey 2017

The 2017 Global Petroleum Survey finds that British Columbia now ranks as the least-attractive Canadian province for oil and gas investment—followed by Alberta. In this year’s global survey, which was conducted after the provincial election, B.C. ranks 76th out of the 97 jurisdictions and earned low marks for political stability and a high cost of regulatory compliance. Alberta ranks 33rd. Newfoundland and Labrador was the most attractive Canadian province for oil and gas investment, and ranks 4th worldwide. Texas is the most attractive jurisdiction globally for oil and gas investment, followed by Oklahoma.

Printer-friendly version
Economic Freedom of the Arab World: 2017 Annual Report

The United Arab Emirates and Bahrain are this year tied as the most economically-free nations in the Arab world, according to Economic Freedom of the Arab World: 2017 Annual Report, co-published by the Fraser Institute, the Friedrich Naumann Foundation for Liberty and the International Research Foundation. This report compares and ranks 22 Arab nations in five areas of economic freedom: size of government, including expenditures, taxes and enterprises; commercial and economic law and security of property rights; access to sound money; freedom to trade internationally; and regulation of credit, labour and business.