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Canadian Consumer Tax Index 2016, finds that the average Canadian family spends more on taxes than on housing, food and clothing combined with 42 per cent of income going to taxes, and 38 per cent being spent on the basic necessities of life. The annual study tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian household from 1961 to 2015, and looks at both visible and hidden taxes that families pay to the federal, provincial and local governments, including income, payroll, sales, property, health, fuel and alcohol taxes, and more.

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Report Card on British Columbia’s Secondary Schools 2016

The Report Card on British Columbia's Secondary Schools 2016 ranks 294 public and independent secondary schools based on seven academic indicators using student results from annual provincewide exams, grade-to-grade transition rates and graduation rates. In addition to five years of academic results, the report card shows which B.C. secondary schools have improved, or fallen behind, based on the academic indicators derived from provincewide test results, grade-to-grade transition, and graduation rates.

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How Alberta's Carbon Emission Cap Will Reduce Oil Sands Growth

How Alberta’s Carbon Emission Cap Will Reduce Oil Sands Growth estimates the Alberta government’s proposed cap on oil sands operations will significantly reduce the industry’s production potential by hundreds of billions of dollars cumulatively between 2025 and 2040, but do very little to curb global greenhouse gas emissions.

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Ontario vs. Michigan: Policy Lessons from the Wolverine State notes that while Michigan has revived its manufacturing sector since the recession, Ontario's manufacturing sector continues to struggle. Michigan's rebound is due largely to several significant policy reforms, which include replacing the complex Michigan Business Tax (MBT) with a simpler corporate income tax of six per cent, implementing sharp budget cuts followed by a period of limited spending growth, and the introduction of “right-to-work” legislation.

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Changes in Economic Freedom in Venezuela, Ireland, and the United States

Changes in Economic Freedom in Venezuela, Ireland, and the United States is a compilation of three essays highlighting what happens to a country when economic freedom levels increase or decline. As an example, one essay finds that eroding economic freedom has spurred the tragedy unfolding in Venezuela.

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The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2016 edition

The Price of Public Health Care Insurance, 2016 Edition helps Canadians better understand that health care is not free; Canadians pay for it through their tax bill. It finds that that the average Canadian family with two parents and two children earning $122,101 will pay $11,494  for public health care insurance in 2016.

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Electoral Rules and Fiscal Policy Outcomes

The federal Liberal government is committed to change Canada’s electoral system in time for the next election. But changing the way a society elects its political representatives changes the incentives and power structure of government, which in turn influences fiscal policy. Electoral Rules and Fiscal Policy Outcomes, the second in a series of essays on electoral reform, spotlights how replacing Canada’s current electoral system with proportional representation would lead to higher government spending and more deficits.

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Report Card on Alberta’s High Schools 2016

The Fraser Institute’s Report Card on Alberta’s High Schools 2016 is  the go-to source for measuring school improvement. The report card provides parents with information they can’t easily get anywhere else. In addition to five years of academic results, the report card shows which Alberta high schools have improved, or fallen behind, based on five academic indicators derived from provincewide test results, grade-to-grade transition, and graduation rates.