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Hugh MacIntyre

Senior Policy Analyst, Fraser Institute

Hugh MacIntyre is a Senior Policy Analyst at the Fraser Institute. He holds an M.Sc. in Political Science from the University of Edinburgh, a Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Economics from Simon Fraser University, and an Honours B.A. from the University of Toronto. Mr. MacIntyre has published over 25 studies and has written over 80 original commentaries appearing in national and regional media outlets including the Globe & Mail and the National Post. His research covers a wide range of economic policy issues including taxation, government finances, government performance, public-private partnerships, labour policy, income mobility, poverty, and charitable giving.

Recent Research by Hugh MacIntyre

— Feb 23, 2018
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Back on Track: How the Federal Liberals Can Deliver Their Promised Balanced Budget by 2019/20

Back on Track: How the Federal Liberals Can Deliver Their Promised Balanced Budget by 2019/20 finds that a modest one per cent reduction in program spending—spread out over two years—would achieve budget balance. Incidentally, since coming into office in 2015, the federal Liberals have increased program spending by 20.1 per cent ($51 billion) in just three years.

— Jan 11, 2018
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The Effect on Canadian Families of Changes to Federal Income Tax and CPP Payroll Tax

The Effect on Canadian Families of Changes to Federal Income Tax and CPP Payroll Tax finds that more than 92 per cent of all families in Canada with children—regardless of their income—will pay higher taxes because of Ottawa’s income tax changes and the increased Canada Pension Plan payroll tax, which will be fully implemented by 2025.

— Dec 13, 2017
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Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2017 Generosity Index

Generosity in Canada and the United States: The 2017 Generosity Index finds that the total amount donated to registered charities by Canadians—just 0.56 per cent of income—is the lowest amount in a decade and down from a 10-year peak of 0.78 per cent in 2006. By comparison, American tax-filers donated 1.76 per cent of their income to registered charities in 2015—more than three times the percentage Canadians claimed on their taxes.