canada-us relations

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The change to world affairs and Canadian foreign policy that began with the horrific attacks of 9-11 was as a big as the onset of the Cold War, only it happened more quickly and with less forewarning. Both America’s role in the world and its identity at home went through a full makeover. Canadians have been affected by the terrorist attacks and by changes to American policy at all levels; in our foreign and defence policy and in our economic and domestic security affairs.


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The world breathed a sigh of relief after President Barack Obama announced the demise of Osama bin Laden in a stunning Special Forces operation. But for Canadian businesses relying on trade with their American counterparts, the nightmare represented by bin Laden continues.


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The U.S Constitution declares that Congress--not the president—is the first branch of government. What does that mean for Canadian-American relations? We conducted a content analysis of America’s national legislature to measure how U.S. Senators and House Representatives perceive Canada. We wanted to determine if the views held by members of Congress were favorable or negative on Canadian policy ideas and bilateral issues.


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Canadians last week welcomed in the New Year with the celebrations across the country. Later this month, Canadian and American governments are expected to jointly announce a new deal on border security, a move that should be celebrated with equal fervor.


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Yesterday, Prime Minister Harper highlighted his government's plans for dealing with the economic slowdown and presented the crisis as an opportunity for Canada: Ultimately, it is an opportunity to position ourselves so that when the recovery comes, we're among the first to catch the wave.


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Canada's top-three economic interests in the new U. S. administration are as follows: First, Canada has a large stake in a more efficient border for trade combined with a more secure border for the movement of people. Currently, commercial costs for crossing the northern border in terms of time losses are estimated at between 2% and 3% of the value of total two-way trade, which was $567-billion or 67% of our trade in 2007.