Post-COVID landscape

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Canada’s Aging Population and Long-Term Projections for Federal Finances

Canada's Aging Population and Long-Term Projections for Federal Finances finds that the federal government is not on track to balance the budget anytime over the next 30 years as a result of Canada’s aging population and Ottawa’s historically high spending pre-COVID.

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Professor Bev Dahlby, one of Canada’s leading tax economists, joins the Fraser Institute as a Senior Fellow

The Fraser Institute is very pleased to announce that Bev Dahlby has joined the Institute as a Senior Fellow. Dahlby is one of the country’s leading tax experts, and was Professor of Economics at the University of Alberta from 1978 to 2012 and Distinguished Fellow in Tax and Economic Growth at the School of Public Policy at the University of Calgary from 2012 to 2020. Throughout his extensive career, Dahlby has not only completed seminal work on a host of economic issues, he has also contributed greatly to actual policy developments in his advisory role for the federal and several provincial governments.

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How Much Could a Guaranteed Annual Income Cost?

How Much Could A Guaranteed Annual Income Cost? finds that if the federal government introduces a Guaranteed Annual Income program, it could cost taxpayers between $131.9 billion and $464.5 billion a year. This study estimates the potential costs of four different potential GAI programs including different options for reducing program costs by “phasing out’ the benefit as an individual’s income rises.

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Illustrating the Tax Implications of a Guaranteed Annual Income

Illustrating the Tax Implications of a Guaranteed Annual Income finds that the federal Goods and Services Tax (GST) would have to increase from the current five per cent to between 26.25 and 105.35 per cent in order to cover the cost of potential Guaranteed Annual Income programs.

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The Changing Size of Government in Canada, 2007–2018

The Changing Size of Government in Canada is a new study that finds the combined size of the federal, provincial and municipal governments increased in every province, relative to the size of their economies, except Saskatchewan and Prince Edward Island over the past 10 years.

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Economic Freedom of the World: 2020 Annual Report

Economic Freedom of the World: 2020 Annual Report is the world’s premier measurement of economic freedom, ranking countries based on five areas—size of government, legal structure and property rights, access to sound money, freedom to trade internationally, regulation of credit, labour and business. In this year’s report, which compares 162 countries and territories, Hong Kong is again number one and Canada (9th) trails the United States (6th).

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Bringing School Choice to Ontario

Bringing School Choice to Ontario is a new study that finds Ontario lacks the school choice for parents and children available to those in BC, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Quebec, as well as 31 U.S. states and most Western European countries. Previous research has found that increased school choice better matches the needs and talents of students with improved programming and resources, and ultimately leads to better education outcomes.

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Report Card on British Columbia's Secondary Schools 2020

The Fraser Institute today released its Report Card on British Columbia’s Secondary Schools, 2020, which ranks 252 public and independent secondary schools based on six academic indicators using student results from annual provincewide exams, grade-to-grade transition rates and graduation rates.