CPP

— May 3, 2018
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Expansion of the Canada Pension Plan and the Unintended Effect on Domestic Investment

Expansion of the Canada Pension Plan and the Unintended Effect on Domestic Investment finds that by increasing the Canada Pension Plan payroll tax, the federal and provincial governments will inadvertently shrink the pool of money available for investments in Canada—potentially up to $114 billion by 2030.

— Apr 4, 2018
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Canadians will receive meagre rate of return on CPP contributions

Canadians born after 1970 can expect a rate of return on their CPP contributions of between 2.3 per cent and 2.5 per cent.

— Jan 17, 2018
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The program is designed so Canadians who die early in life subsidize those who live longer.
— Jan 11, 2018
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The increased CPP tax alone translates into $1,624 more in taxes.

— Jan 11, 2018
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The Effect on Canadian Families of Changes to Federal Income Tax and CPP Payroll Tax

The Effect on Canadian Families of Changes to Federal Income Tax and CPP Payroll Tax finds that more than 92 per cent of all families in Canada with children—regardless of their income—will pay higher taxes because of Ottawa’s income tax changes and the increased Canada Pension Plan payroll tax, which will be fully implemented by 2025.

— Dec 14, 2017
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CPP reforms need a complete rethink

For retirees born after 1993, the CPP rate of return will be a meagre 2.5 per cent.