regulations

9:00AM
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This year’s Economic Freedom of North America 2014 (EFNA) report shows that, once again, while we are the United States, our states have bigger differences than climate, seasons and terrain.


6:00AM
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In many Canadian cities, if you try to catch a cab in the dead of winter, after a hockey game, early in the morning after exiting a club, or at peak holiday times, good luck. Most Canadian cities of significant size have regulations that limit the number of taxis. That creates an artificial shortage and plenty of shivering Canadians on sidewalks from coast to coast.


6:00AM
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Business investment decisions are of course complex. Among the many factors that a company considers before deciding where to set up operations, expand, or relocate are a jurisdiction’s regulatory burden, market proximity, labour availability, and transportation infrastructure.


2:00AM
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As vacationers travel around Canada this summer, here is a question to ponder for those who sip fine Canadian wine: why do so many provincial politicians oppose free trade in wine among the provinces?

Before last year, it was illegal for Canadian wineries to ship direct to consumers in another province. That was unlike say, how a Quebec dairy producer can sell cheese to a grocery store chain based anywhere in Canada.


2:00AM
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Michael Binnion, CEO of Questerre Energy and head of the Quebec Oil and Gas Association, has a great blog post up in which he discusses the impact that equalization payments have on Quebec's energy and natural resource policy.

Looking at Quebec's budget, Binnion observes:


2:00AM
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Whenever Canadians cross the border, it is inevitable they will find cheaper goods in the United States. Whether milk, books, electronic goods or vehicles, it seems bargains abound south of the 49th parallel.

The Canadian Senate has just done a bang-up job of adding hard data to anecdotal observations on this issue. In a recent report, the Standing Senate Committee on National Finance found several reasons for higher Canadian prices, including higher regulations in Canada and higher taxes. (The latter explains the difference in gasoline and diesel prices at the pump, for example.)