bc government

3:28PM
Printer-friendly version

The recent move by Kinder Morgan on the Trans Mountain pipeline was a massive blow to Canada’s investment attractiveness.


1:53PM
Printer-friendly version

Business investment (excluding residential structures) is down nearly 20 per cent since the third quarter of 2014.


3:13PM
Printer-friendly version

Without adequate access to pipelines—the cheaper and safer mode of transportation—there has been a shift to more crude-by-rail.


4:12PM
Printer-friendly version
B.C.’s 2018 budget fails to deal with competitiveness

From 2014 to 2016, non-residential business investment in B.C. declined 19 per cent after accounting for inflation.


2:00AM
Printer-friendly version

Tuesday’s BC budget, which Finance Minister Michael de Jong called boring, balanced, should have set out an ambitious agenda for the next four years.


2:00AM
Printer-friendly version

While Premier Christy Clark aims “to create an environment where growth and investment can flourish,” little has been achieved since last year’s electoral victory. If Premier Clark is to help British Columbians obtain the desired prosperity and jobs, her top economic priority should be to make BC the most investment-friendly jurisdiction in Canada.

Here’s what’s needed.


2:00AM
Printer-friendly version

When Christy Clark recently asserted British Columbia didn’t need the federal government and also said “we don't need Alberta,” the B.C. premier demonstrated why Canada’s founding fathers were concerned about provincial politicians: when they think in isolation, such premiers harm the interests of all Canadians.

The context of Clark’s election-time remark was how BC could become an energy superpower if more natural gas was developed and delivered through pipelines, as opposed to “allowing” oil pipelines to crisscross British Columbia more than they already do.