retirement plan

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The Ontario Liberals recently introduced legislation to create a mandatory government pension plan modelled after the Canada Pension Plan.

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The Ontario government's proposal to supplement the Canada Pension Plan with its own compulsory pension plan is based on a series of faulty assumptions.


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In Alberta, almost twice as many workers in the government sector possessed defined benefit pension plans in 2011 when compared with private sector employees. That might explain why so many government employees’ unions, from the Alberta Union of Public Employees to the United Nurses of Alberta, vociferously oppose modest pension reforms proposed by Finance Minister Doug Horner.


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One benefit of column writing is the chance for feedback from readers, be they fans, critics or the merely curious. Responses arrive that reflect the rainbow of human emotion from cheery agreement to annoyance to the equivalent of typed-out road rage.

Much of what I (and my colleagues) do is analyze how politicians spend tax dollars and how governments affect our lives in multiple ways. As a result, any report or column that recommends a change to the status quo is sure to touch someone’s interest. Predictably, that touches a nerve and sets off a reaction.


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The upcoming meeting of federal and provincial finance ministers will touch on what’s become a politically charged debate about expanding the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). Proponents have tried to convince Canadians they are not saving sufficiently for retirement with some even suggesting we are on the brink of a retirement crisis. These views simply do not reconcile with the available empirical evidence. Thankfully, there’s no retirement crisis in Canada.

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The tone and language used by Professor Rhys Kesselman in his criticism of our recent study on the CPP and RRSPs is a far cry from the professionalism and decorum one would expect from a distinguished economist and holder of a Canada Research Chair. Rather than stick to debating the facts, Professor Kesselman stoops to innuendoes and school yard taunts to disparage our work. Reasonable people should be able to disagree without being disagreeable.