RRSP

3:37PM
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The evidence does not support claims of a widespread retirement savings problem in Canada.

5:04PM
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Lack of a workplace pension does not doom someone to a financially insecure retirement.

9:00AM
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In recent years, there’s been a strong push to expand the Canada Pension Plan, and Ontario intends to launch an additional mandatory pension plan in January 2017.

2:00AM
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One theory about politics is that because politicians must get votes to stay in power—that’s their “currency”— they are unlikely to act against their own self-interest. So politicians cater to the specific voters who put them in power in the first place.


2:00AM
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In Alberta, almost twice as many workers in the government sector possessed defined benefit pension plans in 2011 when compared with private sector employees. That might explain why so many government employees’ unions, from the Alberta Union of Public Employees to the United Nurses of Alberta, vociferously oppose modest pension reforms proposed by Finance Minister Doug Horner.


2:00AM
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The upcoming meeting of federal and provincial finance ministers will touch on what’s become a politically charged debate about expanding the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). Proponents have tried to convince Canadians they are not saving sufficiently for retirement with some even suggesting we are on the brink of a retirement crisis. These views simply do not reconcile with the available empirical evidence. Thankfully, there’s no retirement crisis in Canada.

2:00AM
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The government sector in Alberta is unhappy and they want Premier Alison Redford and her colleagues to know it. Universities are advertising against provincial reductions in their funding; government unions are activating their members about proposed pension changes, reforms that would make them more akin to the private sector and less like a taxpayer-funded entitlement.

It is not clear why the government sector believes it must be immune from change. The case for reform is not difficult to make.


3:00AM
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Some provincial politicians are again trying to make the dubious case that we have a "retirement income crisis" to revive calls for a mandatory expansion to the Canada Pension Plan (CPP).  While the issue is set to be on the agend


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When Alberta’s Finance Minister Doug Horner recently announced that the province will reform public sector pension plans, the reaction was predictable: government employees’ unions set their collective hair on fire. Thus, Guy Smith, Alberta Union of Provincial Employees president, remarked that the province’s planned reforms will “fundamentally” undermine the “the retirement security of more than 70,000 AUPE members.”