supply management

3:50PM
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When the Australian market was deregulated in 2000, the average price farmers received for raw milk almost doubled.


12:10PM
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Canada's trade hurdle—it’s all about supply management

Canada has less leverage with U.S. negotiators now than before the U.S.-Mexico deal.


5:30AM
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In renegotiating NAFTA, President Trump wants to end Canada’s supply management system.


2:23PM
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NAFTA negotiations—Canada should not object to increased domestic competition

Eliminating restrictive dairy industry protections could lower dairy costs for Canadians by up to 40 per cent.


3:00AM
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No normal person pays close attention to who is “in” or “out” as finance minister, and that’s a good thing. It means the politician in question has avoided messing up the lives of ordinary Canadians. Still, their actions can and do matter, for better or worse.


2:00AM
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As a publicity stunt, the recent New Democratic Party proposal to limit withdrawal fees at some automated teller machines (ATMs) at fifty cents worked well. But getting publicity for an idea, including a poor one, is one thing; getting attention to useful reforms that will greatly benefit consumers is quite another. The ATM idea is a good example of the former and not the latter.


2:00AM
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There are few Canadians who understand agricultural supply management and how it affects their daily lives, which is a major reason why this outdated system has survived. It’s receiving greater scrutiny now, though, because it’s impeding trade agreements.


2:00AM
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Around Labour Day, a plethora of news stories focus on the state of unions, and often, their interaction with business. Given the name of the holiday, the attention is understandable.

However, the focus on unions and corporations, especially where governments are involved to set policy and create legislation, often misses two other critical groups: consumers and taxpayers.

It is those two cohorts that are often overlooked and whose interests are damaged when governments assume, on purpose or by accident, that only the interests of organized labour and business matter.