tax burden

If you think June 9 is too late for Tax Freedom Day, just wait

In 2017, the average Canadian family with two or more people will pay $47,135 in total taxes.

Printer-friendly version

Summary

  • In 2017, the average Canadian family will earn $108,674 in income and pay a total of $47,135 in taxes (43.4%).
  • If the average Canadian family had to pay its total tax bill of $47,135 up front, it would have worked until June 8 to pay the total tax bill imposed on them by all three levels of government (federal, provincial, and local).
  • This means that in 2017, the average Canadian family will celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 9.
  • Tax Freedom Day in 2017 arrives one day later than in 2016, when it fell on June 8, because the average Canadian family’s total tax bill is expected to increase at a faster rate this year (2.4%) than the growth in income (2.2%).
  • Tax Freedom Day for each province varies according to the extent of the provincially levied tax burden. The earliest provincial Tax Freedom Day falls on May 21 in Alberta, while the latest falls on June 25 in Newfoundland & Labrador.
  • The Balanced Budget Tax Freedom Day for Canada arrives on June 18. Put differently, if governments had to increase taxes to balance their budgets instead of financing expenditures with deficits, Tax Freedom Day would arrive 9 days later.

Top earners already shoulder much of Canada’s tax burden

In 2013, the top 10 per cent of tax-filers earned 35 per cent of Canada’s total income yet paid 54 per cent of federal and provincial income taxes.
Printer-friendly version

In 2016, the average Canadian family will earn $105,236 in income and pay a total of $45,167 in taxes (42.9%).

If the average Canadian family had to pay its total tax bill of $45,167 up front, it would have worked until June 6 to pay the total tax bill imposed on it by all three levels of government (federal, provincial, and local).

This means that in 2016, the average Canadian family will celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 7.

While Tax Freedom Day in 2016 arrives two days earlier than in 2015, when it fell on June 9, there is little to cheer about as the earlier date is not the result of any major tax reductions by Canadian governments. Rather, it is the result of the leap year in 2016, conservative government projections of tax revenues, and weak economies in some provinces.

Tax Freedom Day for each province varies according to the extent of the provincially levied tax burden. The earliest provincial Tax Freedom Day falls on May 17 in Alberta, while the latest falls on June 14 in Newfoundland & Labrador.

The Balanced Budget Tax Freedom Day for Canada arrives on June 18. Put differently, if governments had to increase taxes to balance their budgets instead of financing expenditures with deficits, Tax Freedom Day would arrive 11 days later.

Are you happy working for the government until June 10?

No one really thinks there shouldn’t be any taxes. After all, how would governments fund important public services that form the foundation of our economy? Think of services such as protecting property, building infrastructure, upholding the legal system, to name a few.
Printer-friendly version

On Tax Freedom Day, the average Canadian family has earned enough money to pay the taxes imposed on it by the three levels of government: federal, provincial, and local. In 2015, Canadians celebrate Tax Freedom Day on June 10. That is, Canadians will have worked until June 9 to pay the total tax bill imposed on them by all levels of government.

Tax Freedom Day in 2015 arrives one day later than in 2014, when it fell on June 9, because the average Canadian family’s total tax bill is expected to increase at a faster rate this year (3.1%) than the growth in income (2.1%). Governments across the country are partly to blame since many have raised taxes this year.

In 2015, seven provincial governments expect to run budget deficits. Had Canadian governments increased taxes even more to balance their budgets, the average Canadian family would have worked until June 13 to pay the tax bill. In other words, the Balanced Budget Tax Freedom Day arrives on June 14, four days later than Tax Freedom Day. In 2015, the average Canadian family will earn $102,874 in income and pay a total of $44,980 in taxes (43.7%).

Tax Freedom Day for each province varies according to the extent of the provincially levied tax burden. The earliest provincial Tax Freedom Day falls on May 19 in Alberta, while the latest falls on June 21 in Newfoundland & Labrador.

Want a middle class? Imitate Alberta and Saskatchewan

There has been much handwringing over the claimed disappearance of the middle class. From a bestselling international tome to domestic tax-and-spend types who think higher taxes will create more middle-income earners, there is no shortage of those who over-focus on redistribution and underestimate the benefits of opportunity.

Subscribe to RSS - tax burden