alberta energy policy

10:46AM
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Investors steering clear of Canada’s energy sector in Alberta and beyond

The U.S. advantage over Canada is not surprising in light of recent U.S. tax cuts and deregulation.


12:22PM
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Report recommendations would politicize decision-making of energy projects

Non-market considerations will play a larger role in determining what the private energy sector can do.


9:53AM
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Over the last few years, GHG emissions from the oilsands have comprised less than 0.15 per cent of global emissions.


3:00AM
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New climate tests are unnecessary since the effects of pipelines and LNG terminals on climate change are negligible at worst and positive at best.

9:52AM
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Trying to stimulate other sectors of the economy so their increased output will balance off the loss in energy will simply build in future problems of maladjustment in these industries.


3:00AM
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Ontario embarked on its Green Energy Act, which subsidizes renewable electricity, and power costs have risen by an estimated 30 per cent.


9:50AM
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The Council managed to cobble together a very scary scenario. However, in doing so, they committed errors of omission and commission that render their report essentially meaningless.


10:00AM
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Since taking office in mid-September, Alberta’s new Premier Jim Prentice has talked an active game on the energy file. From the perspective of those who believe that Canada’s energy exports are vital to the country’s economic health, many of his comments seem positive. But there is one area where Mr. Prentice’s energy-policy comments are troubling.