Ontario Prosperity

— Jun 19, 2018
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Increasing the Minimum Wage in Ontario: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy

Increasing the Minimum Wage in Ontario: A Flawed Anti-Poverty Policy finds that raising the minimum wage would do little to reduce poverty in Ontario because the vast majority of minimum-wage earners don’t live in low-income households. In fact, nearly 60 per cent of all minimum-wage earners in the province in 2017 were teenagers or young adults aged 15 to 24, almost all of whom (86.3 per cent) lived with their parents or other relatives.

— Apr 24, 2018
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Time for Tax Reform in Ontario

Time for Tax Reform in Ontario finds that if Ontario replaced its current seven-tier tax rate system with a single personal income tax rate of eight per cent and reduced its corporate income tax rate from 11.5 per cent to 8 per cent, it would be one of the most competitive pro-growth tax jurisdictions, which would help the province compete for business investment and skilled labour with neighbouring U.S. jurisdictions.

— Apr 12, 2018
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Understanding the Changes in Ontario's Electricity Markets and Their Effects

Understanding Changes in Ontario’s Electricity Markets and Their Effects finds that poor energy policy choices—including Ontario’s Green Energy Act—has increased electricity prices for residents, cost tens of thousands of manufacturing workers their jobs and produced only minimal health and environmental benefits.

— Mar 15, 2018
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Ontario’s Lost Decade: 2007–2016

Ontario’s Lost Decade: 2007-2016 finds that, despite upbeat government rhetoric, Ontario’s economic growth in 2017 was not enough to repair the damage done during the preceding decade when the province’s economic performance was among the worst in Canada. In fact, from 2007 to 2016 Ontario was at or near the bottom on several important economic indicators compared to Canada’s other provinces, including per capita GDP growth, debt accumulation and annual private-sector job growth.

— Feb 6, 2018
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Repeating Past Mistakes? Spending Restraint Critical for Ontario’s Fiscal Health

Repeating Past Mistakes? Spending Restraint Critical for Ontario’s Fiscal Health finds that the Ontario government is ramping up program spending by more than $7 billion this year, or nearly six per cent—more than three times higher than the average increase in the years following the 2009 recession.

— Nov 2, 2017
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Uneven Recovery: Much of Ontario Still Hasn't Fully Recovered from the 2008 Recession

Uneven Recovery: Much of Ontario Still Hasn't Fully Recovered from the 2008 Recession finds that employment growth in Ontario since the recession has been heavily concentrated in the Greater Toronto and Ottawa areas, while many of the province’s other cities and towns are still struggling economically. In fact, 11 of the province’s 23 urban areas actually experienced net job losses from 2008 to 2016.

Ontario Prosperity Research Experts