Ontario Prosperity

— Aug 25, 2022
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Comparing per-Person Spending and Revenue in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, 2009–2019

Comparing per-Person Spending and Revenue in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area, 2009–2019 is a new study that finds across the 26 municipalities that constitute the GTHA, per person spending (adjusted for inflation) increased by 9.6 per cent between 2009 and 2019, and Toronto remained the highest spending municipality in 2019. Not surprisingly, there is a connection between high spending municipalities and high tax municipalities, as Toronto, the highest spending municipality was also the 3rd highest taxing municipality (total per person revenues adjusted for inflation) in 2019.

— Aug 4, 2022
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Ford Government Plans to Outspend Wynne Government

Ford Government Plans to Outspend Wynne Government finds that, despite any rhetoric to the contrary, the current Ontario government plans to outspend its predecessor.

— Mar 31, 2022
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Learning from Ontario’s Past

Learning from Ontario’s Past: How Ontario Can Avoid Another Post-Recession Debt Binge is a new study that focuses on how the provincial government could balance the budget by 2022/23, and what mistakes made by past governments should be avoided to ensure fiscal stability. Based on recent projections, the provincial government would need to reduce annual spending by $9.1 billion from its 2021/22 level to balance the budget in 2022/23—a 4.8 per cent decrease.

— Feb 1, 2022
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Measuring Ontario’s Regional Prosperity Gap, 2022 Update

Measuring Ontario’s Regional Prosperity Gap: 2022 Update is a new study that compares average incomes in Ontario, Quebec and eight American states in the Great Lakes region. It finds that in 2020, Ontario’s GDP per person trailed neighbouring Michigan by over $6,000, and in fact, Ontario lags the regional average GDP per person by $19,219 or 32.7 per cent.

— Jan 5, 2022
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Uneven Job Creation in Ontario’s Urban Centres from 2008 to 2019

Uneven Job creation in Ontario’s Urban Centres from 2008 to 2019 finds that despite the rate of job creation in the Toronto and Ottawa areas exceeding the national average, most other Ontario cities, towns and rural areas experienced little or no job growth since the 2008/09 recession.

— Nov 9, 2021
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The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Ontario

The Implications of an Aging Population for Government Finances in Ontario is a new study that finds health-care expenditures in the province will increase by an estimated 4.1 per cent annually (on average) over the next 20 years, and as a result of Ontario’s changing demographics, the province may not balance its budget until at least 2040/41 unless it makes changes to its spending.

Ontario Prosperity Research Experts