Ontario Prosperity

— Nov 2, 2017
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Uneven Recovery: Much of Ontario Still Hasn't Fully Recovered from the 2008 Recession

Uneven Recovery: Much of Ontario Still Hasn't Fully Recovered from the 2008 Recession finds that employment growth in Ontario since the recession has been heavily concentrated in the Greater Toronto and Ottawa areas, while many of the province’s other cities and towns are still struggling economically. In fact, 11 of the province’s 23 urban areas actually experienced net job losses from 2008 to 2016.

— Oct 17, 2017
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Rising Electricity Costs and Declining Employment in Ontario’s Manufacturing Sector

Rising Electricity Costs and Declining Employment in Ontario’s Manufacturing Sector finds that Ontario’s rising electricity prices—now the highest in Canada—have cost the province an estimated 74,881 manufacturing jobs since the 2008 recession.

— Sep 19, 2017
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Ontario Enters Uncharted Waters with a $15 Minimum Wage

Ontario Enters Uncharted Waters with a $15 Minimum Wage finds that raising Ontario’s minimum wage to $15 an hour—a staggering 32 per cent increase over the current minimum wage—will lead to job losses across the province for Ontario’s young and low-skilled workers, especially outside Toronto.

— Aug 3, 2017
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Wishful Thinking: An Analysis of Ontario’s Timeline for Shrinking Its Debt Burden

Wishful Thinking: An Analysis of Ontario’s Timeline for Shrinking Its Debt Burden finds that Queen’s Park’s timeline for reducing the province’s historically high debt burden relies on optimistic and questionable assumptions and lacks a detailed, credible plan to achieve it.

— Jul 20, 2017
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Evaluating Electricity Price Growth in Ontario

Evaluating Electricity Price Growth in Ontario finds that hydro prices in Ontario increased twice as fast as the national average over the past decade, and the average Toronto resident now pays $60 more per month than the average Canadian for electricity.

— Jul 5, 2017
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Ontario’s One Cylinder Economy: Housing in Toronto and Weak Business Investment finds that housing in the Toronto area—both homebuilding costs and record high prices—accounted for over a quarter (29.0 per cent) of Ontario’s income growth from 2015 to 2016. With the provincial economy increasingly dependent on Toronto’s housing market for growth, it is especially vulnerable if the market cools.

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Ontario Prosperity Research Experts

  • Director, Provincial Prosperity Studies, Fraser Institute