canadian economy

9:27AM
Printer-friendly version

Canada enjoyed an economic and fiscal renaissance starting in the mid-1990s that lasted more than a decade.


8:53AM
Printer-friendly version

An "implicit tax" is implicit only in the sense that it doesn’t officially appear in the income tax code.


12:41PM
Printer-friendly version

With a relatively weak Canadian economy, depressed commodity prices and the myriad of international economic issues (i.e. uncertainty in China), federal parties should offer solutions to the economic storm clouds on the horizon.


6:00AM
Printer-friendly version

As everyone from the Manitoba-Ontario border to Tofino knows, the local and provincial economies, which depend on resource extraction, have slowed.


9:00AM
Printer-friendly version

When French President Francois Hollande visited Canada recently, one hopes the Gallic leader looked around. If he did, he would have noticed a stark difference in the economic opportunities between the two countries with the advantages mostly on this side of the Atlantic.


6:00AM
Printer-friendly version

Canadian headlines about government deficits and debt can be dizzying and hard for people to grasp. A few billion here and several billion there and the natural response is for one’s eyes to glaze over in despair. But the increasing government debt has tangible and immediate consequences that affect Canadian families today and into the future.


2:00AM
Printer-friendly version

Lost in the current flurry of Ontario’s election campaign is the one key issue facing the province, and indeed all of Canada: Ontario’s laggard economic performance is dragging down the national economy.


3:00AM
Printer-friendly version

No normal person pays close attention to who is "in" or "out" as finance minister, and that's a good thing. It means the politician in question has avoided messing up the lives of ordinary Canadians. Still, their actions can and do matter, for better or worse.


3:00AM
Printer-friendly version

Recently, Green Party leader Elizabeth May orchestrated an open letter to United States Secretary of State John Kerry, urging the U.S. to reject the Keystone XL pipeline. In her note, Ms. May states that she sent Mr. Kerry "4 facts about Keystone XL." Unfortunately, two of Ms. May's facts aren't actually facts, and two of her facts are so lacking in context as to constitute merely factoids.