Government Spending & Taxes

— Sep 26, 2017
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Measuring the Impact of Federal Personal Income Tax Changes on Middle Income Canadian Families

Measuring the Impact of Federal Personal Income Tax Changes on Middle Income Canadian Families finds that 81 per cent of middle-class families in Canada are paying higher income taxes due to changes made by the federal government. On average, middle-class families with children will pay $840 more in federal income taxes this year.

— Sep 7, 2017
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Canada’s Past Fiscal Leaders Are Now Fiscal Laggards: An Analysis of 2017 Provincial Budgets

Canada’s Past Fiscal Leaders Are Now Fiscal Laggards: An Analysis of 2017 Provincial Budgets finds that Ontario and Alberta, which once boasted of having strong fiscal records, are now among the country’s most unsuccessful financial managers. And Quebec and Saskatchewan, which have both struggled in the past as weak fiscal performers, are now pursuing policies that are gradually improving the condition of their public finances.

— Sep 6, 2017
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Education Spending and Public Student Enrolment in Canada, 2017 Edition

Education Spending and Public Student Enrolment in Canada, 2017 finds that per-student spending in public schools increased in every province over the past decade (2004/05 to 2014/15), and across Canada, the average increase was 22.3 per cent (adjusted for inflation). In fact, education spending nationwide increased more than $17 billion, even though public school enrolment declined by 3.0 per cent over the same period.

— Sep 6, 2017
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Understanding the Increases in Education Spending, 2017 Edition

Understanding the Increases in Education Spending in Public Schools in Canada, 2017 finds that public school spending across Canada increased by $17.5 billion over the past decade (2004/05 to 2014/15) and nearly eight out of every 10 dollars of increased funding was spent on teacher and staff compensation, including salaries, benefits and pensions.

— Aug 24, 2017
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Canadian Consumer Tax Index 2017 finds that last year the average Canadian family paid twice as much of their income in taxes (42.5 per cent) as they did for housing (22.1 per cent). The annual study tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian household from 1961 to 2016, and looks at both visible and hidden taxes that families pay to the federal, provincial and local governments, including income, payroll, sales, property, health, fuel and alcohol taxes, and more.

— Aug 22, 2017
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Should Equalization Keep On Growing in an Era of Converging Fiscal Capacity

Should Equalization Keep on Growing in an Era of Converging Fiscal Capacity? finds that, as traditional “have” provinces struggle economically, Canada’s equalization program is not equipped to adapt to the country’s new economic landscape. In fact, a rule introduced to cap equalization increases to ensure program affordability could actually add as much as $2.7 billion to program costs over the next two years.

— Aug 10, 2017
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Rae Days in Alberta: The Notley Government at Two Years

Rae Days in Alberta: The Notley Government at Two Years finds that Alberta’s NDP government under Premier Rachel Notley is following the failed policies of Bob Rae’s NDP government in Ontario in the 1990s rather than the successful NDP government of Roy Romanow in Saskatchewan.

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