Government Spending & Taxes

— Sep 17, 2020
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How Much Could a Guaranteed Annual Income Cost?

How Much Could A Guaranteed Annual Income Cost? finds that if the federal government introduces a Guaranteed Annual Income program, it could cost taxpayers between $131.9 billion and $464.5 billion a year. This study estimates the potential costs of four different potential GAI programs including different options for reducing program costs by “phasing out’ the benefit as an individual’s income rises.

— Sep 17, 2020
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Illustrating the Tax Implications of a Guaranteed Annual Income

Illustrating the Tax Implications of a Guaranteed Annual Income finds that the federal Goods and Services Tax (GST) would have to increase from the current five per cent to between 26.25 and 105.35 per cent in order to cover the cost of potential Guaranteed Annual Income programs.

— Sep 15, 2020
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The Changing Size of Government in Canada, 2007–2018

The Changing Size of Government in Canada is a new study that finds the combined size of the federal, provincial and municipal governments increased in every province, relative to the size of their economies, except Saskatchewan and Prince Edward Island over the past 10 years.

— Sep 1, 2020
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Canadian Consumer Tax Index, 2020 finds that last year the average Canadian family spent 42.6 per cent of its income on taxes, more than housing, food and clothing costs combined, which made up just 36.2 per cent. The annual study tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian household from 1961 to 2019, and looks at both visible and hidden taxes that families pay to the federal, provincial and local governments, including income, payroll, sales, property, health, fuel and alcohol taxes, and more.

— Aug 27, 2020
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Federal Government Wasting Billions on Poorly Targeted Assistance

Federal Government Wasting Billions on Poorly Targeted Assistance is a new study that finds the federal government is potentially wasting more than $22 billion in COVID recession spending because the money is not being adequately targeted to those in need. Crucially, more than one-in-four dollars (27.4 per cent) of the COVID-related spending included in the analysis is potentially going to Canadians with questionable need at a time when Ottawa is running a historic deficit.

— Aug 13, 2020
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The Issues Facing Canada's Employment Insurance Program

The Issues Facing Canada’s Employment Insurance Program is a new study that finds the current design of Canada’s employment insurance program creates regional disparities, distorts labour markets, provides inadequate coverage for part-time workers and the self-employed, and will impose a financial burden on Canadians.

— Aug 6, 2020
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Who Bears the Burden of British Columbia’s Employer Health Tax?

Who Bears the Burden of British Columbia’s Employer Health Tax? Finds that B.C.’s new “health tax,” which essentially replaced the province’s Medical Services Plan (MSP), will cost the average worker nearly $3,000 per year in foregone wages.

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